British Isles weather diary

January 2014
February 2014
March 2014
April 2014
May 2014
June 2014
July 2014
August 2014
September 2014
October 2014
November 2014
December 2014
(Note: figures in parentheses give an indication, from first reports, of the spread of daily max and min temperatures, min daytime temperatures (occasionally), rainfall and sunshine in the 24 hours ending 2100 GMT.)

British Isles weather, January 2014

With low pressure centred over Cent Ireland at 1200 GMT on the 1st (969 mb) and later over Cent Scotland (971 mb) at 2400 GMT, this was another windy day. Parts of NE England and E Scotland had an early ground frost while rain affected S England, Wales and W parts of Britain before dawn. During the day spells of rain, heavy in places, became widespread across all but N and Cent Scotland - the rain reached these latter areas during the evening as the depression moved N'wards. The result was a dull day for all but parts of E Scotland although it was mild in the SW'ly flow to the S of the low. Severe weather led to serious flooding in Devon, prompting a number of rescues. Six people, including a baby, were trapped in cars in flood water in three separate incidents at Fenny Bridges, Ford Bridge and Avonwick, South Brent. A canoeist was rescued after becoming stranded on an island in the middle of the swollen river Dart at Hembury Castle, Buckfastleigh. Flooding has also affected Kenn, near Exeter and Feniton. Sporting fixtures, including racing at Exeter and Exeter City's football match against Wycombe Wanderers, were cancelled. The weather also led to the cancellation of a number of annual New Year's Day swims in Devon and Cornwall and in other places along the south coast. (Bude 13.1C, Loch Glascarnoch 4.2C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule -1.0C minimum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 44.0 mm, Kinloss 3.8 h.)

An area of low pressure over N Scotland early on the 2nd soon moved away to the N while the new low system moved from the W towards W Ireland by 2400 GMT (MSL pressure 962.1 mb at Belmullet by this time). The result was a blustery day across all areas. Ireland was generally dry overnight and widespread cloud prevented an air frost at low level stations. The overnight rain across the UK tended to move away to the E - to be soon followed by further rain that began moved E'wards over Ireland around dawn. However, ahead of this next spell of rain - which extended across most of the UK by late evening, there were sunny spells in most areas. (Swanage 11.8C, Dalwhinnie 4.6C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 1.5C minimum, Kirkwall 16.0 mm, Wattisham 6.3 h.)

A deep low moved N'ward off W Scotland during the 3rd - MSL pressure fell to 951.2 mb at South Uist Range at 1200 GMT. Ahead of the low there was a slight ground in parts of N Scotland - most other places had some rain overnight, and most places had further spells rain during the day. Much of England and Wales and parts of E Ireland had some sunny spells, however. Showers turned thundery in Cornwall in the morning and there were further thunderstorms here and in the Channel Islands and at Northolt later in the afternoon. Other showers turned wintry with falls of sleet and snow in some N and Cent parts of Scotland. In Bristol, city centre streets were flooded with water from the River Avon at high tide. High tides and strong winds caused flooding in some coastal areas of Northern Ireland but the tide peaked without major flooding in Belfast. The emergency services had warned of a possible tidal surge hitting the city and police built walls of sandbags in parts of central and east Belfast. Homes on the coast around Aberystwyth were also evacuated ahead of Friday night's high tide. Around 100 people were taking shelter at rest centres with waves of up to 1.8 m peaking in the town and at Borth, 13 km away. Severe flood warnings, where there is a danger to life, were in place while an earlier one for the Usk estuary at Newport was stood down. The Cornish seaside town of Looe was inundated and about 20 shops suffered the wrath of a high spring tide driven by strong winds. (Shoeburyness 11.4C, Dalwhinnie 3.9C maximum, Drumnadrochit -0.4C minimum, Tyndrum 68.0 mm, Waddington 4.3 h.)

Many parts of Ireland had a slight ground on the 4th as many other areas of the British Isles had further spells of overnight. During the day there was persistent and heavy rain in E and cent S England in particular with lesser falls across parts of Scotland and N Ireland. For much of the UK it was a generally cloudy day due to the presence of fronts and troughs, although Ireland and Cornwall had some sunny intervals. Sleet was reported falling before dawn in parts of Somerset and Wiltshire and also later in Cornwall in the evening. Ronaldsway reported a thunderstorm with hail around dawn. (Shoreham 10.5C, Lough Fea 2.2C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule -1.3C minimum, Otterbourne Water Works 28.6 mm, Dublin Airport 5.8 h.)

During the 5th another deep depression headed across the Atlantic towards W Ireland, MSL pressure falling to 971.1 mb at Belmullet by 2400 GMT. Associated fronts cross Ireland during the morning, and the UK during the afternoon and evening. Overnight clearing skies led to a widespread ground frost and an air frost in some places from N Scotland to Cornwall. Falls of rain during the day were heavy in parts of SW England and S Ireland and winds strengthened, blowing from a SW'ly direction. E parts of Scotland and England remained largely dry until the evening and there were a few sunny intervals here during the day. In the evening some sleet was reported falling at Belmullet. (Bude 14.1C, Dalwhinnie 3.4C maximum, Altnaharra -6.6C minimum, Capel Curig 27.6 mm, Dyce 2.5 h.)

During the 6th deep area of low pressure moved N'wards just to the W of Ireland and Scotland. MSL pressure fell to 963.5 mb at Belmullet at 0600 GMT and also at South Uist Range at 1800 GMT. There was widespread and, in places, heavy rain overnight as fronts crossed the British Isles with further falls of rain and showers in all area during the day. Some of these showers turned thunder in places from W Ireland to Hampshire at times during the day. Many places in England had some sunny intervals during the day and it was quite mild for the time of year in S England with temperatures reaching 12C in places. Gusts reached 50-60 kn in some coastal areas exposed to the SW wind with a report of gusts to 81 mph at The Needles. Residents at Iford Bridge home park near Christchurch faced another two nights out of their homes after being evacuated due to flooding , while locals in Wareham said the River Frome was at the highest level they had ever seen. The Environment Agency warned communities in Dorset, Oxfordshire, south Wiltshire, Hampshire and along the Thames to "remain prepared" for more flooding during the rest of the week. Huge waves have battered southern and western coasts of the UK as a result of the winds and tides; waves of up to 8 m were recorded off Land's End, Cornwall. In Aberystwyth, all buildings along the promenade were evacuated after Natural Resources Wales (NRW) warned of an "exceptional" wave swell expected later. Buses were replacing trains on Northern Rail services between Carlisle and Workington, with disruption expected to last up to a week. Island Line services on the Isle of Wight were suspended until further notice because of severe flooding in the Ryde area while a recent landslip caused by poor weather meant buses replaced Southern trains between Horsham and Dorking. Major roads in areas including North Ayrshire, Pembrokeshire, Oxfordshire, West Sussex, Surrey, Kent, Hampshire, Norfolk, Wiltshire, Isle of Wight, Somerset, Dorset and Devon were closed because of flooding. A woman and her dog stranded in a house on the Somerset Levels for 13 days were rescued by boat and the Thames Barrier was closed for the ninth tide in a row. (Manston 13.0C, Loch Glascarnoch 6.0C maximum, Resallach 0.7C minimum, Tyndrum 28.2 mm, Waddington 5.3 h.)

With low pressure close to NW Scotland on the 7th this was another blustery day. There was no overnight air frost due to the wind, and most places had some spells of rain at times before dawn. Further spells of rain continued to affect most areas during the day, although N England and E areas of Scotland had mainly slight falls. Between the bouts of rain there were also sunny intervals, particularly in England and Wales. There was thundery activity on SW England early in the morning, and also later in parts of Cent S England and Norfolk. Hail fell in parts of S England during the day. (Manston 12.5C, Dalwhinnie 5.4C maximum, Resallach 3.4C minimum, Achnagart 66.8 mm, St Athan 5.5 h.)

Overnight into the 8th there were spells of rain across Scotland and W Ireland, and also in parts of England and Wales. By dawn skies had partially cleared across S England, S Wales and in S and Cent Ireland. Across Scotland the rain area retreated N'wards during the day. By midday an area of wind and rain had moved NE'wards into SW England and this then spread across much of England, Wales and Ireland by midnight - at which time two low pressure centres (1000 mb each) were located over NW Wales and to the W of Cornwall. E and N England , N Ireland much of Scotland had some sunny intervals during the day - elsewhere it soon clouded over around dawn. (Kew Gardens 12.4C, Carterhouse 5.2C maximum, Drumnadrochit 2.0C minimum, Lake Vyrnwy 32.2 mm, Boulmer 5.9 h.)

Low pressure crossed E'wards over the UK 9th and was followed by a weak ridge over the British Isles by 2400 GMT. As the associated rain moved E'wards, it gave way to mist and fog patches across Ireland before dawn with an air frost in places. There was also an air frost in parts of E Scotland. By dawn the main rain area was mainly confined to E areas of England - with slight falls over across N and W Scotland. The rain persisted across N Scotland for much of the day at low levels. Some W areas of the British Isles had showers during the day - with hail on Guernsey in the evening. Most places, except in N Scotland, had sunny periods during the day. (Shoeburyness 10.3C, Spadeadam 4.2C maximum, Braemar -3.1C minimum, Coton-In-The-Elms 20.0 mm, Filton 5.7 h.)

There was a widespread ground frost early on the 10th with a slight air frost in parts of the Midlands and Cent S England - under clear skies. Frontal cloud gave some rain across W parts of Ireland and Scotland by dawn - and during the day this frontal precipitation moved slowly E'wards to give falls in many parts of England and Scotland by the end of the evening. Ahead of the rain there were sunny periods in many E and Cent parts of England, with further sunshine in between showers in W Ireland once the main rain area had cleared. (Swanage 11.2C, Dalwhinnie 4.8C maximum, Hurn -1.8C minimum, Capel Curig 23.0 mm, Wattisham 6.6 h.)

High pressure dominated the weather on the 11th resulting in a widespread in Scotland and Cent Ireland before dawn, although there was widespread rainfall across much of England and Wales overnight as an occluded front cleared away E'wards here. Some overnight rain and showers also fell in NW Ireland and W Scotland, and on the Northern Isles. These showers also fell as hail on the Northern Isles, with further hail showers here during the day; in NW and cent Scotland there were also falls of snow, which continued into the afternoon. Rainfall was mostly confined to these N areas and to W Scotland and N Ireland during the day. After a mainly sunny day elsewhere, mist and fog became widespread across England by midnight. (St Helier 10.6C, Killylane 0.8C maximum, Katesbridge -3.8C minimum, Baltasound 10.2 mm, Filton 7.5 h.)

Mist and fog patches were widespread across England and Wales before dawn on the 12th and there was a widespread ground frost everywhere except in W Ireland and some SW parts of Wales and England. Air frost was widespread across Britain. High pressure soon gave way to low pressure with fronts spreading rain E'wards to all areas by the end of the day. By mid-morning rain and drizzle had fallen across most of Ireland - and a little rain also fell overnight in parts of N Scotland. Away from parts of E England it was mainly a cloudy day after dawn; as the rain met colder air it turned to sleet or snow in places - including across high ground in N England in the evening. (Bude 11.3C, Redesdale Camp 2.0C maximum, Aboyne -6.0C minimum, Banagher Caugh Hill 20.4 mm, Manston 5.9 h.)

A sequence of fronts and a shallow area of low pressure meant an unsettled day in most areas on the 13th. Much of Scotland and Ireland, in particular, had a widespread ground frost by dawn; across Scotland this followed the clearance of rain - which was followed by showery conditions in W Scotland and W Ireland around dawn. Wales, SW and cent S England had widespread rainfall during the day - this moved into E England in the evening. The Northern Isles also has=d some heavy rain during the day, while E Scotland and E England had sunny spells ahead of cloud and rain in the evening. Thunder was heard during showers in the afternoon in Hampshire. (Swanage 10.3C, Dalwhinnie 3.3C maximum, Aboyne -3.6C minimum, Aberdaron 14.8 mm, Leconfield 7.0 h.)

Further frontal rain affected the British Isles on the 14th. Ahead of this rain, many parts of Ireland, Scotland, S wales and cent S England had an air frost before dawn; N Wales, N England and S Scotland had light rain and drizzle in the early hours which gave way to patches of mist and fog by mid-morning; some of this precipitation fell as sleet or snow over high ground in N England and S Scotland. By midday rain was falling in W Ireland and SW Scotland and this rain moved into Wales and SW England by the evening, later reaching E England and SE Scotland by midnight. Falls also affected W Scotland in the evening; ahead of the rain, much of England (except N England) had sunny spells before cloud arrived from the W. (Isles of Scilly 10.8C, Loch Glascarnoch 0.6C maximum, Katesbridge -6.2C minimum, Mumbles Head 16.8 mm, Odiham 5.9 h.)

It remained dry for a while in parts of Cent Scotland before dawn, allowing for air frost to form here on the 15th. But by mid-morning rain was falling here, as it had done elsewhere in the British Isles overnight due to a warm sector passage. As a result of the warm sector, minimum temperatures in SW Ireland overnight were as high as 10C - across Wales and NW England it was a wet night. Rainfall was widespread during the day, with the cold front lying from E Scotland to London by 2400 GMT. Only in W Ireland, in a showery flow following the cold front, was there much afternoon sunshine. (Chivenor 12.5C, Resallach 5.4C maximum, Cassley -0.3C minimum, Eskdalemuir 31.8 mm, Shannon Airport 4.1 h.)

A low pressure crossed Ireland towards the E during the 16th, MSL pressure falling to 976.9 mb at mace Head at 0600 GMT. While parts of N Scotland had a slight air frost before dawn, overnight minimum temperatures remained above 6C in some parts of S England. Moderate to heavy falls of rain were widespread overnight except in some W areas of Ireland and Scotland, while the advancing low brought further rain to the S half of England and Wales during the day. E Scotland and NE England were among the sunniest regions, while showers fell as hail in parts of S England during the early morning. (Odiham 11.6C, Drumnadrochit 1.8C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -3.6C minimum, Middle Wallop 17.2 mm, Morecambe 6.0 h.)

A S'ly airflow in most areas on the 17th was the result of low pressure over, or to the W of, Ireland. N Scotland had a slight ground before dawn, while there was some rainfall in most other areas overnight. To the south of London these falls were very heavy. Further falls of rain and showers continued during the morning, although it did turn drier in the afternoon in many areas - with mist forming in the evening in cent England and E Scotland. Later in the evening, further rain pushed N into S England. Following the heavy rain in SE England, flooding was expected to cause more disruption. Flooding severely disrupted road and rail services for commuters in SE England. The Balcombe Tunnel flooded, disrupting trains between London and Brighton and drivers faced road closures in Kent, Sussex and Surrey due to flooding. The Environment Agency had issued 11 flood warnings for parts of Kent, Sussex, Surrey, Oxfordshire and Berkshire. (Plymouth 11.6C, Braemar 3.7C maximum, Lentran -0.9C minimum, Charlwood 46.0 mm, Yeovilton 5.8 h.)

Spells of frontal rain and an area of low pressure moving from Cornwall across Ireland gave another unsettled day on the 18th. A few places in cent and E Scotland had a slight air frost early in the day while across W Ireland, Wales and in much of S and Cent England there was rainfall in the early hours. N England and E Scotland had some fog patches before dawn, and did Cent Ireland. As the rain in the S moved N'wards during the day, falls became heaviest across Wales and SW England; cloud was widespread and of the SYNOP stations only St Helier and Cork reported in excess of 1 h of bright sunshine. In parts of N England and N Ireland the rain turned to sleet for a while in the morning as it moved N'wards. A woman was rescued from marshland in Devon after getting stuck in heavy rain at Abbeyford Woods, near Okehampton. Buses replaced trains on lines in south Devon and flooding was reported by police around Exeter; Exeter City's football game with Morecambe was called off because of a flooded pitch. (Northolt 11.2C, Derrylin Cornahoule 2.8C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -2.6C minimum, Pembrey Sands 28.2 mm, Cork Airport 2.9 h.)

Many parts of Ireland S Wales and SW England had an early ground frost on the 19th while further E there were some heavy falls of rain overnight, with sleet or snow over higher ground. During the day the main rain area transferred towards the E coast of Britain with S Wales, SW and Cent S England having a sunny day. It remained rather dull and cloudy across N Scotland with rain here for much of the day. Mist patches formed in the evening in some E parts of England. (Plymouth 10.4C, Altnahinch Filters 3.3C maximum, Castlederg -2.1C minimum, Braemar 29.0 mm, Yeovilton 7.4 h.)

There was a widespread inland ground frost across the British Isles on the 20th although some rain and showers fell overnight in a few W areas, mainly W Ireland, SW Scotland, W Wales and Cornwall. Central areas of England, in particular, had a moderate air frost before dawn, and there was widespread mist and fog, thick in places, across much of England by dawn. Parts of E England remained rather misty/foggy during the day (it was a cold day here) and the rain in the W tended to die out by midday, except over W Scotland where it continued to make slow progress E'wards. Hail fell at Camborne in the afternoon, while mist and fog returned to much of England in the evening. A walker escaped uninjured from an avalanche in the Cairngorms; the 47-year-old went through a cornice in Coire Cas, triggering the snow slide. Reports said that it was a huge avalanche - the tip was about 150 metres wide and in some places it was two to three metres deep. Seventy-five avalanches have been recorded by the Sportscotland Avalanche Information Service in the last month. (Lee-on-Solent 11.0C, Marham 3.7C maximum, Dishforth -4.3C minimum, Lerwick 9.0 mm, Nottingham 7.1 h.)

Much of England and parts of N Scotland had an air frost early on the 21st; there was widespread mist and fog by dawn across England - the fog was thick in places with some falls of snow grains - which across Ireland and SW Scotland it was cloudier overnight with some rain and drizzle. During the day the rain area made slow progress E'wards, affecting Wales, SW England and W Scotland by later afternoon. The mist and fog lingered all day in parts of E England and the rain had not reached the extreme SE of England and much of East Anglia by midnight. Ahead of the rain the best of any sunshine was to be found in S England. (Isles of Scilly 10.9C, Dalwhinnie 2.5C maximum, Leconfield -4.6C minimum, Machrihanish 35.0mm, Manston 4.5 h.)

Troughs and frontal systems moved E'wards across the British Isles on the 22nd to give spells of rain to most areas. Overnight there was some heavy rainfall in Britain although falls were lighter across Ireland. As the rain cleared W parts of Britain mist and fog patches formed in places - and these lingered all day in parts of England. Further rain spread from the W during the day although daytime falls were mainly slight. (Swanage 11.6C, Fylingdales 4.7C maximum, Hurn -2.3C minimum, Carterhouse 29.0 mm, Kinloss 4.2 h.)

Fronts brought further spells of rain to the British Isles on the 23rd. Many parts of England and E Scotland had an early ground frost - in parts of England there was a slight air frost - while Wales, W Scotland and much of Ireland had overnight rain and showers. Mist and fog patches in E England gave way to rain by late morning with rain then falling at times in most places during the day. Across parts of N and Cent Scotland the rain turned to sleet and snow for a time. (Isles of Scilly and St Helier 10.4C, Carterhouse 2.7C maximum, South Newington -1.1C minimum, Baltasound 32.8 mm, Morecambe 4.3 h.)

A low pressure system brought further fronts across the British Isles on the 24th and the MSL pressure fell to 991.3 mb at Sule Skerry at 1800 GMT. Clear skies in E Britain led to a widespread ground frost here for a while, along with an air frost in places; further W warm air followed an area of rain into Ireland - and into Wales, SW England and SW Scotland by dawn and minimum temperatures in SW Ireland were closer to 7C. The rain areas moved NE'wards and E'wards during the day giving most places some rain by midnight - although it dried up in Ireland in the evening. Only in places near to the E coast of England was there any sunshine during the day. A "major incident" was declared for all areas affected by flooding in Somerset following warnings of further heavy rain. Many villagers are already cut off by floods and Somerset County Council said its priority was to keep people safe. Sedgemoor District Council has made the same announcement so it can also mobilise extra support. The area's MP said there was a risk of catastrophic flooding unless action was taken and he asked for government help. A major incident is declared where there is a situation which could not be dealt with easily by the local council and could threaten lives, disrupt the community or damage property. The village of Muchelney in south Somerset has been cut off for almost a month. (Cork Airport 12.3C, Strathallan 3.0C maximum, Aboyne -4.8C minimum, Cardinham 34.8 mm, Wattisham 2.6 h.)

The 25thwas a breezy day with spells of rain across Britain overnight and in all areas during the day. Following the clearance of rain and drizzle to the E, it was a misty morning across England and Wales with some thick fog patches in places. Across much of Scotland there was little respite between the bursts of rain overnight and with rain continuing during the day is was generally dull here. Elsewhere, there were sunny intervals during the day; a few snow flurries occurred at low levels - for example at Connaught Airport in the last afternoon and at Tulloch Bridge in the evening. For some in England the rainfall during the day was associated with a cold front which created a squall line. The weather along this included a narrow band of thunderstorms (for example in the afternoon from N London to Lincolnshire), intense rain and some hail. According to the Met Office this squall line swept across Wales and then moved SE'wards across southern parts of England - bringing about 6 mm of rain to places in a very short period of time with gusts of wind of around 60 mph or more in places. Damaging winds brought reports of tornadoes (as yet unconfirmed) in Chobham (Surrey) and Hunton (Kent); about 13,000 customers were left without power in Kent, Sussex and Surrey after the stormy conditions. Peak gusts from SYNOP reports during the day included 58 kn at Aberdaron and 55 kn at Baltasound. (Gravesend 12.7C, Aviemore 3.7C maximum, South Newington 1.7C minimum, Dalwhinnie 22.4 mm, Cork Airport 3.9 h.)

During the 26th a deep depression headed towards NW Scotland, pushing fronts across the British Isles; MSL pressure fell to 961.5 mb at South Uist Range at 2400 GMT. Many inland areas away from S Ireland and S England had a slight ground frost for a while overnight - while by dawn rain had fallen as far E as SW England, Wales and W Scotland. 20 mm of rain fell in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT. The frontal rain spread quickly E during the day giving falls in all areas; showers followed the rain - from late morning in Ireland. The showers fell as hail in places with thunder at Shannon Airport in the afternoon. Peak gusts from SYNOP reports during the day included 63 kn at Sule Skerry, South Uist Range and Lerwick with 61 kn at Fair Isle and Baltasound. In Scotland rain turned to sleet and snow from late morning onwards and wintry falls were also reported later in parts of Cent S England and the Channel islands. Routes across Scotland were affected by the conditions. Traffic Scotland said a number of routes had been hit by flooding and snow while strong winds saw some bridges shut to high-sided vehicles. It said the snow gates on the A93 between Braemar and Spittal of Glenshee had been closed. The Friarton and Skye Bridges were closed for a time to high-sided vehicles and surface water caused problems on routes in Dumfries and Galloway and Strathclyde. (Exeter Airport 12.1C, Dalwhinnie 2.3C maximum, Aboyne -1.7C minimum, Achnagart 37.8 mm, Kinloss 2.9 h.)

A low pressure area centred close to W Scotland slowly migrated S to N Ireland during the 27th; as the central pressure decreased - down to 972 mb at 2400 GMT over N Ireland - the winds eased off a little. Peak gusts from SYNOP reports during the day included 59 kn at Fair Isle at 0000 GMT and 58 kn at Sule Skerry at 1200 GMT. After an early touch of ground frost in many E areas of Britain, rain spread E'wards to most parts by dawn - and further falls of rain continued to affect most areas during the day, with the most persistent falls being close to the low centre over Ireland and W Scotland. Some thunder was reported before dawn at Shannon and Guernsey airports and hail showers continued throughout the day in Cornwall and the Channel Islands. Across Scotland precipitation fell as snow in some areas. Parts of a Scottish ski centre have been almost completely buried under snow following six weeks of snowfalls. Staff at Glencoe Mountain said the depths "massively exceeded" those experienced in the winter of 2009-10, one of Scotland's best ski seasons. The resort's ski patrol shed, which is a log cabin, is one of the areas at the site which has been buried. (Murlough 10.0C, Lerwick 2.6C maximum, Fylingdales -0.3C minimum, Lusa 37.2 mm, Herstmonceux 4.1 h.)

The 28th saw an area of low pressure moved from N Ireland to NW Wales, introducing an SE'ly/E'ly flow into many N and E areas of Britain. The presence of the low meant generally cloudy skies during the day, the exception being the extreme W of Ireland and Scotland - and also parts of S England for a while. It was a wet night in many areas - although parts of E England and East Anglia remained dry overnight - while during the day the rain areas moved E'wards with the low and it turned drier in W Scotland and W Ireland. There were hail showers before dawn in the Channel Islands while in Scotland the cold, E'ly flow led to falls of snow in the N. (Northolt 10.4C, Aviemore 2.8C maximum, Dalwhinnie 0.0C minimum, Lake Vyrnwy 34.2 mm, Tiree 6.2 h.)

The 29th dawned with a complex area of low pressure over the British Isles - this was to move slowly SE'wards during the day. Many places saw some rainfall overnight and there were further falls across the British Isles during the day. As a result of extensive cloud due to fronts associated with the low pressure there was little sunshine during the day, except on Orkney and in W Ireland and by midnight it had turned misty in some parts of N England and Ireland as the rain cleared to the S. In a cool SE'ly surface flow, Lerwick reported sleet at 2400 GMT. (Lusa 10.0C, Wych Cross 3.3C maximum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 0.9C minimum, Dalwhinnie 26.8 mm, Cork Airport 6.5 h.)

An E'ly to SE'ly flow affected most areas on the 30th. Cloud and rain gradually became confined to East Anglia and Cent S and SE England by dawn - while a new system brought some light rain and drizzle to W and S Ireland by this time. NE Scotland also had some light rain overnight while elsewhere mist and haze were widespread. During the day light rain continued to affect NE Scotland and East Anglia in particular, with some heavier falls across W Ireland. Except for a few places in SW Scotland and E Ireland it was a dull day - and it was also a cold one with daytime temperatures failing to reach 5C away from S and Cent Ireland and places bordering the English Channel. Some snow and hail showers fell in the Northern Isles and there were also wintry falls in parts of the N Midlands and Lincolnshire. (Valentia and Jersey Airport 8.6C, Lake Vyrnwy 0.2C maximum, Bridgefoot -3.4C minimum, Writtle 10.8 mm, Prestwick 4.3 h.)

Many areas had a ground frost early on the 31st with air frost in places from NW Scotland to the S coast of England. There was little overnight rain except in NE Scotland and W Ireland - 13 mm fell in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT at Valentia as a frontal system reached Ireland from the W. Much of England and Wales had a misty start to the day with some fog patches but by mid-morning the rain over Ireland had spread into Cent Scotland, Wales and SW England. By mid-afternoon all areas has seen rainfall - which turned to sleet and snow over high ground from the Pennines N'wards, and also in parts of Ireland. Parts of East Anglia had some sunshine during the morning, ahead of the rain, while it turned brighter across W Ireland later in the day. The rain was accompanied by strengthening winds due to a deep Atlantic low - gusts included one of 62 kn at Fair Isle at 1800 GMT as the MSL pressure fell to 971.7 mb at Stornoway at 2400 GMT. High tides, rain and strong winds continued to cause problems as south-west England and the Midlands are braced for floods. Dangerous high tides would affect the south-west coast from Hartland Point in north Devon round Land's End to Plymouth, including Wadebridge and Bude but excluding Truro and Plymouth Barbican, the Environment Agency said. Snow has made driving conditions difficult in parts of Scotland, with a crash involving two lorries and a car leading to the closure of the A9 near Drumochter. In Wales, Aberystwyth University's seafront halls of residence are to be evacuated until Monday. Buildings there have been evacuated several times in recent weeks. Flood defences on part of the Welsh coast, washed away by recent storms, have been reinforced with bags of slate set down by a helicopter. In the Somerset Levels, the Environment Agency said it was running pumps 24 hours a day to drain the water. It said 62 pumps were removing about 1.5 million tonnes of water - equivalent to 600 Olympic-sized swimming pools - each day. (Isles of Scilly 11.0C, Carterhouse 2.4C maximum, Kinlochewe -2.5C minimum, Capel Curig 27.6 mm, Cork Airport 2.0 h.)

British Isles weather, February 2014

Pressure remained very low to the W of the British Isles during the 1st; MSL pressure fell to 957.5 mb at Finner at 1200 GMT. Precipitation was widespread overnight with sleet and snow in parts of Ireland and W Scotland, and as far S as high ground in Cornwall before dawn. Away from E England most areas had a touch of ground frost. Further snow fell during the day in parts of Ireland and Scotland - with Guernsey reporting snow showers at 0900 GMT. Hail showers also fell in some N areas. During the day much of E England remained largely dry with sunny spells although W areas of the British Isles remained generally cloudy with spells of rain and drizzle. High tides and gale-force winds caused flooding along Guernsey's west coast; police closed parts of the coastal roads here. High tides and strong winds also left parts of Cumbria's coast flooded, roads closed and trains cancelled. Northern Rail said trains had been affected between Barrow and Millom and from Workington to Carlisle. Elsewhere in the county the A592 Kirkstone Pass was partly closed after an ambulance and a number of cars had to be abandoned in the snow. High winds and heavy rain have also caused disruption in parts of Northern Ireland, with a number of roads closed because of flooding. In the Republic of Ireland hundreds of people were moved from their homes in Limerick, with the River Shannon's banks bursting at several locations. Gusts of 63 kn were reported at Aberdaron in the afternoon. (Gravesend 9.4C, Dalwhinnie 2.1C maximum, Lentran -1.5C minimum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 27.8 mm, Wattisham 6.6 h.)

Overnight into the 2nd it was a mainly mild night although parts of N Scotland had a slight ground frost. Precipitation was mainly confined to Ireland, Wales and other W parts of Britain both overnight and during the day, with falls becoming lighter during the day as the surface flow turned to a mild, S'ly direction. Most places had some sunny spells during the day, although it remained windy in the W. Ten people were rescued after a bus was hit by a large wave in Newgale during high winds and high tides along the Welsh coast, while Ceredigion council was assessing the damage to Aberystwyth promenade after waves hit the seafront for the second time this year. (Camborne 11.1C, Dalwhinnie 3.7C maximum, Cassley -0.2C minimum, Tyndrum 29.2 mm, Boulmer 7.0 h.)

The 3rd dawned after a mainly mild and dry night, although there was some heavy rain overnight in W Ireland (28 mm fell at Valentia in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT) and a slight ground frost in N Scotland. During the day the rain in W Ireland slowly spread E'wards, reaching W Scotland, Wales and SW England during the evening,; in the evening some snow was reported at Dunkeswell. In most places it was a cloudy, dull day - although there were long sunny spells in parts of East Anglia and Kent. (Aultbea 10.4C, Carterhouse 4.5C maximum, Cranwell -0.5C minimum, Scolton Country Park 34.2 mm, Manston 7.2h.)

During the first half of the 4th a cold front rapidly crossed England and Scotland in a NE'ly direction, while by midnight pressure had fallen to 951.3 mb ahead of the next depression located to the SW of Ireland. To the rear of the cold front there was a ground frost across Ireland, Wales and SW England, the front bring a short spell of rain - and sleet or snow to SW Scotland and the Isle of Man. The rain area moved away to the NE during the day, with further rainfall in most places by midnight ahead of the low centre. There were, however, some sunny intervals between the two rain areas in most places. (Isles of Scilly 10.1C, Dalwhinnie 3.2C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule -0.7C minimum, Dunkeswell 22.6 mm, Magilligan 6.5 h.)

During the 5th a deep area of low pressure moved from SW Ireland the NE Scotland. It was accompanied by strong winds to the S and E, and brought heavy rainfall in places. Ahead of the low there was a ground frost in N Scotland while most other areas had rainfall by dawn. Further spells of rain followed during the day, which was generally cloudy. Wind gusts in the 17 hours ending 0800 GMT included 92 mph at Scilly, 91 mph at Berry Head, 76 mph at Culdrose and 71 mph at Plymouth and Needles Old Battery. Rainfall in the same period included 33.4 mm at North Wyke, according to the Met Office. The storm which destroyed a stretch of railway, forced people from their homes and left thousands without power. A section of the sea wall in Dawlish, Devon, collapsed and left the railway to Cornwall suspended in mid-air. Residents of homes on the Somerset Levels were evacuated amid fears flood defences could be overwhelmed. Network Rail has estimated the damage at Dawlish could take at least six weeks to fix. First Great Western said the repairs could not begin until the weather improved. Twenty people were evacuated from Kingsand in Cornwall because their homes were being damaged by stones washed ashore and coming through their windows. Devon and Cornwall Police received 300 emergency calls overnight. About 100 trees were reported blown over. In Brighton, a significant section of the West Pier skeleton collapsed in high winds and stormy seas. Homes were evacuated on the seafront in Torcross, Devon, after waves smashed the front of four buildings. Portsmouth Historic Dockyard was closed because high winds were causing roof tiles to blow around. Southern said trains were suspended between Bexhill and Hastings after high tides and winds caused flooding at Bexhill while South West Trains said a speed restriction of 50 mph would be imposed on some routes between 1000 and 1900 GMT. In Wales, a number of main roads were closed by fallen trees or flooding. Firefighters have also been called out to deal with dangerous structures. There were two incidents in the Tenby area of Pembrokeshire with roofing being blown off buildings. Thunder was reported in both Shetland and the Channel Islands during the day. (Swanage 10.7C, Dalwhinnie 4.1C maximum, Cassley -0.6C minimum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 35.2 mm, Wattisham 2.9 h.)

Low pressure systems continued to dominate the weather on the 6th, initially in the N and later in the SW. There was little air frost overnight while rainfall was quite widespread across Wales (it was heavy in places here), Scotland and W Ireland. This rain area moved NE'wards during the morning; also during the morning rain towards the S of Britain pushed into S England before moving N through Wales and into East Anglia and the N Midlands by the evening. At 2400 GMT MSL pressure was down to 977.3 mb at Dunkeswell. In between the two rain areas there was some sunshine - although much of England and Wales remained cloudy and sunless. Some snow fell in S Wales in the evening as the temperature fell. (St Helier 11.2C, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 4.2C maximum, Drumnadrochit -1.4C maximum, Wiggonholt 28.6 mm, Magilligan 5.4 h.)

Low pressure over SW England at the start of the 7th moved quickly NE during the day, and by 2400 GMT the MSL pressure at Valentia had fallen to 961.0 mb at Valentia ahead of the next low system. Scotland and N Ireland had a widespread ground frost with an air frost across Scotland early in the morning although there was a little rain in some W areas before dawn; across England and Wales cloudy skies gave rain in most places which moved slowly NE'wards. Fog in Cumbria led to falls of snow grains at Spadeadam. Rainfall was much lighter across Britain during the day - although in the afternoon another rain area moved into SW Ireland and then spread into S Scotland and much of England and Wales by the end of the evening - the weather turning drier later in S Ireland. In between the rain areas most places had spells of sunshine, especially across S England. Thousands of pupils were sent home and residents rescued by boat after heavy rain in Essex caused flooding; the occupants of 20 flats in Saffron Walden were helped to safety by fire crews. The service received more than 200 calls about flooding from people in the north and west of the county. (St Helier 10.5C, Carterhouse 4.3C maximum, Braemar -4.5C minimum, Rothamsted 23.8 mm, St Helier 7.2 h.)

A deep area of low pressure moved NE'wards close to W parts of Ireland and Scotland on the 8th. MSL pressure dropped to 946.2 mb at Belmullet at 1200 GMT. Precipitation was widespread overnight although falls were slight in N Scotland, although this area had some air frost before dawn. As the rain moved N it turned to sleet and snow in parts of Scotland and N England. Rain continued to fall in most areas during the day although falls were mainly slight in E England. Jersey reported a thunderstorm with hail in the evening and hail was also reported in parts of SW England in the evening. Reported wind gusts in SYNOP reports during the day included 68 kn at Mumbles, 67 kn at Scilly and 62 kn at Aberdaron. (Shoeburyness 10.3C, Dalwhinnie 3.1C maximum, Altnaharra -3.0C minimum, Libanus 47.0 mm, St Helier 7.3 h.)

Low pressure centres again led to a blustery day in many areas on the 9th. Rainfall was widespread overnight, although it gradually eased off in E and SE England. There were also reports of hail showers in Cornwall and the Channel Islands in the morning. Gusts in excess of 50 kn were reported in some coastal areas in the morning but wind speeds steadily decreased during the day - falls of rain in E Britain were mainly light during the day and most places had some sunny intervals. A Met Office amber warning, meaning "be prepared", for wind was in place along with flood warnings for the Lower Dee Valley, Severn and Wye. Road and rail disruption continued - the M4 near Swansea reopened at 11:00 GMT after recovery teams moved a lorry which hit the central barrier on the Briton Ferry bridge and overturned on Saturday. Services had waited for winds to die down before taking the vehicle away. In Powys, the A490 Welshpool remained closed both ways between A458 and B4388 because of flooding. The M48 Severn Bridge and the Cleddau Bridge in Pembrokeshire were subject to intermittent restrictions due to high winds while the railway line between Abergavenny and Hereford was reopened following an earlier landslip. (St Helier 10.0C, Okehampton 3.6C maximum, Tain Range 0.0C minimum, Capel Curig 31.2 mm, St Helier 5.9 h.)

An area of low pressured moved E'wards on the 10th from S Ireland across S parts of the British Isles. Fronts associated with this, and with another low off N Scotland, brought rainfall to many areas overnight and during the day. In the evening another depression, then close to W Ireland, brought another area of rain into Ireland. By dawn much of N and E Ireland, the Midlands, N Wales and N England had a slight air frost while parts of Cent S England had some mist and fog patches around dawn - misty conditions also formed in the evening in parts of the N Midlands and N England. (Kew Gardens 10.8C, Keele 2.9C maximum, Katesbridge -4.5C minimum, Wych Cross 13.6 mm, Morecambe 7.3 h.)

An area of low pressure to the NW of Ireland pushed frontal rain across most areas of the British Isles by midday on the 11th with showery troughs affected further places to the rear of the fronts. Ahead of the rain there was an air frost in parts of E Scotland and E England by dawn - with some mist in parts of N England and the N Midlands. As the advancing rain met this cold air it turned to sleet or snow in parts of N England and Scotland. Showers of hail were reported in parts of S England, W Ireland and the Channel Islands with thunder being heard in some of these areas also. Colder air behind the fronts in a brisk W'ly flow led to further snowfalls during the day in many parts of Scotland, Ireland, and in N England and the N Midlands. (St Helier 9.5C, Dalwhinnie 0.9C maximum, Aboyne -4.7C minimum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 25.6 mm, Aldergrove 5.8 h.)

During the 12th a vigorous area of low pressure moved into W Ireland (MSL pressure 956.1mb at Belmullet at 1200 GMT) and then towards NE Scotland by midnight, giving a day of wet and windy weather to all areas. There was an early air frost in much of Scotland, N Ireland and N England with further falls of sleet and snow in these areas. Rainfall was heavy during the day in many places with NE Scotland having the best of any sunshine ahead of the low. Showers following the frontal rain turned thundery in some parts of S England and the Channel Islands. Parts of Scotland and Ireland had further falls of snow during the day. According to the Met Office the strongest gusts during the day included 112 mph at Great Dun Fell, 108 mph at Aberdaron, 96 mph at Mumbles Head, Needles Old Battery and Lake Vyrnwy, 93 mph at Capel Curig and 92 mph at High Bradfield. A man died apparently trying to clear a fallen tree as hurricane-force winds batter parts of the UK; he died after the tree brought down power cables in Wiltshire and was possibly electrocuted. Power and transport networks were badly hit. Surrey Fire & Rescue said it had rescued 250 people from floods during the day. As of 2100 GMT about 115,000 homes in parts of England and Wales were still without power. A section of the west coast main line in Lancashire was closed between 1900 GMT and 2100 GMT, while the M6 at Thelwall Viaduct was closed in both directions between junctions 20 and 21. The M62 was also shut both ways between junction 22 and 23. At Crewe railway station about 500 passengers were evacuated and taken to a nearby hotel after roof panels fell on to overhead lines and caused a fire, leaving trains stranded outside the station. West Country rail services were severely affected by the severe flooding, while services in Oxfordshire, Hampshire, Sussex, Kent and Surrey have been heavily disrupted. Virgin Trains advised all passengers not to attempt travel and there are major disruptions for other rail services, with severe delays between Reading and London due to flooding near Maidenhead. Most of Virgin's west coast main line services were suspended. (Exeter Airport 10.6C, Loch Glascarnoch 1.5C minimum, Resallach -3.4C minimum, Shap 38.0 mm, Kirkwall 5.3 h.)

Low pressure areas centred close to N Scotland produced a brisk W'ly flow across much of the British Isles on the 13th. There was a widespread ground frost before dawn in many areas and many places had a mostly dry day - away from Scotland and N and W Ireland. Wales, and W-facing coastal areas of England and Ireland had showery falls overnight and during the day - E areas had sunny spells. Across Scotland rainfall was more persistent - and it was a rather dull day here. In Jersey and Cornwall hail showers were reported while snow fell in many places from the N midlands N'wards. Snow and ice in western and northern parts of Northern Ireland made driving conditions difficult for a second consecutive day. Ulsterbus services between Clogher and Omagh, County Tyrone, were cancelled. In County Down, the A2 coastal road between Warrenpoint and Rostrever is to stay shut for at least three days after it partially collapsed on Wednesday. Meanwhile, NIE was sending 70 staff to the Republic of Ireland to help repair its storm-damaged electricity network. (Writtle 9.7C, Carterhouse 2.3C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -2.7C minimum, Kinlochewe 64.6 mm, Leconfield 7.4 h.)

During the 14th another deep depression moved NE'wards across Ireland from midday - MSL pressure at the centre was down to about 957-958 mb. By dawn overnight rain had largely cleared across Scotland and there was a widespread ground frost across the British Isles; but another area of rain was by then already affecting S Ireland and SW England. As the rain moved N'wards during the day some snow fell on the N flank across Ireland, N England and Scotland in particular. Traffic Scotland described driving conditions in some parts of Dumfries and Galloway as "extremely hazardous". Strong winds and snow were also predicted to cause some issues with visibility on higher ground, and the snow gates were closed at Braemar, Spittal of Glenshee and Cockbridge - Tomintoul; the public to be careful when visiting Scotland's hills and mountains over the weekend, with avalanche warnings in place across a number of popular destinations. All train services west of Plymouth were cancelled during the day, and there were be no replacement buses. First Great Western said coach companies had refused to run rail replacement services in Cornwall due to the "unsafe" conditions. Only in NE Scotland and the Channels Islands was there any bright sunshine during the day. (Exeter Airport 12.6C, Carterhouse 3.0C maximum, Drumnadrochit -1.3C minimum, Ballypatrick Forest 38.8 mm, Lerwick 4.6 h.)

An area of low pressure (MSL pressure 958.8mb at West Freugh at 0000 GMT) moved towards Norway during the 15th, filling as it did so and introducing a lighter NW'ly flow to most areas. Peak gusts reported at 0000 GMT included 65 kn at Mumbles, 62 kn at St Athan, 64 kn at South Farnborough and 67 kn at Portland. Rainfall was widespread during the day but by the evening had largely cleared outside of Scotland - and by midnight the rain was mostly affecting just N Scotland. Heavy rain and strong winds have been battering Devon and Cornwall again, with further flooding in some coastal communities. Power cuts affected about 6,700 homes in Devon and Cornwall. In Dawlish thirty people have been evacuated from Sea Lawn Terrace as a safety precaution because of high tides and strong winds. Seventeen people were evacuated from flats in Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan after the roof was damaged in strong winds overnight. (Gravesend 11.9C, Braemar 3.6C maximum, Braemar -0.4C minimum, Capel Curig 49.8 mm, Shannon Airport 6.4 h.)

The 16th dawned after a widespread ground frost across the British Isles and some rainfall - mostly in N and W Scotland. During the day the rain in N Scotland steadily cleared towards the N and snowfall died out at low levels. Most other areas had a mostly dry day as a weak ridge of high pressure formed across S Britain - but by late afternoon further frontal rain was spreading into W Ireland and this then moved into SW England and SW Scotland in the evening. Dozens of volunteers turned out to shovel snow from a Cumbria ski slope after a substantial fall buried equipment. The Lake District Ski Club tow, on Raise, next to Helvellyn, was out of action when 5m of snow fell in recent storms. Patterdale Mountain Rescue Team warned the avalanche risk in the area was high. Away from W Ireland and NE Scotland most areas had a day with long sunny spells. The Nevis Range ski resort had its busiest day for 10 years; almost 1,700 skiers and snowboarders took to the slopes of Aonach Mor and snow cover was described as "wall-to-wall". The resort was not even able to operate all of its lifts because some were still buried under the unprecedented amounts of snow. The managing director of the resort said it had snowed every day since 20 December; she added that with the amount of snow which had already fallen there was a good chance the season could last until late spring or even summer. (Plymouth 11.6C, Dalwhinnie 3.5C maximum, Exeter Airport -3.1C minimum, Resallach 11.8 mm, Wellesbourne 9.0 h.)

Low pressure spread frontal rain across most places on the 17th although falls in E England were slight until the evening. The day dawned with a sharp ground frost in many parts of E Scotland and a widespread ground frost in E England. N and E Scotland also had a sharp air frost. Further W under cloudy skies there had been widespread rainfall, especially in Ireland where the overnight minimum temperature at Valentia was 7.0C. Cloud soon spread into all areas in the morning and the day was a mostly dull one - with mist and fog in E and NE England that lingered until midday in places. Some hail showers were reported during the day in the Northern Isles. Walkers and climbers are being warned to take extra care in the mountains following a string of rescues in Snowdonia at the weekend. (Gravesend 12.0C, Drumnadrochit 2.7C maximum, Altnaharra -7.7C minimum, Derrylin Cornahoule 37.4 mm, Kirkwall 4.5 h.)

With low pressure centred close to, or over, Scotland on the 18th it was a rather cloudy day here. Most places had rainfall overnight - which was largely frost-free due to the cloud cover - while during the day most rain was confined to Scotland. There were some showers in S England while parts of E and S Britain had some mist and fog around dawn. Despite the presence of low pressure the pressure gradient, and hence winds, were generally slack. (Exeter Airport 12.6C, Resallach 3.4C maximum, Lerwick -2.2C minimum, Bridgefoot 16.0 mm, Bude 8.5 h.)

Most places were free of air frost on the 19th although the Midlands and cent S England had a widespread ground frost. Overnight rainfall affected mostly Scotland and N England with mist and fog patches across the S half of England and Wales. Scotland was mainly dry during the day with sunshine in the N; W Ireland had a dull day with rain spreading E'wards across much of Ireland in the evening. S parts of England and Wales were rather cloudy with some light rain and showers - other areas had a rather cloudy day with some sunny intervals. However, by midnight the rain in Ireland had spread E'wards across most of the UK. (Hereford 13.3C, Braemar 4.8C maximum, Baltasound -0.4C minimum, Port Ellen 9.8 mm, Kinloss 6.6 h.)

With low pressure centred off N Scotland at midday, a series of fronts crossing the British Isles brought spells of rain to all areas on the 20th. Falls were lighter in the E with very little rain falling in parts of East Anglia and E England - and in most areas there was some sunshine in between successive bands of rain. (Coningsby 13.7C, Lough Fea 5.2C maximum, Baltasound 2.7C minimum, Harris Quidnish 36.2 mm, Wellesbourne 5.5 h.)

A blustery W'ly flow affected most areas on the 21st; an overnight ground frost was widespread across England but most places escaped an air frost. Spells of rain and showers affected mostly W areas of the British Isles - falling as snow over some high ground in Scotland, especially. Thunder was reported at times during the morning and evening in the Channel Islands. S and E England, in particular, had long sunny spells during the day. (St James Park 11.4C, Carterhouse 4.0C maximum, Normanby Hall -0.1C minimum, Achnagart 46.4 mm, Wattisham 8.2 h.)

As a W'ly surface flow backed to the SW, a warm sector crossed the W half of the British Isles - and Scotland - on the 22nd. Overnight, and early in the day, brought rain to Scotland and N parts of Ireland and England. Falls from the warm front were relatively light and much of England had a sunny day ahead of the advancing cloud. (Gravesend 12.9C, Dalwhinnie 5.4C maximum, Resallach 0.9C minimum, Achnagart 22.9 mm, Herstmonceux 8.6 h.)

A warm sector meant a mild start to the 23rd; the overnight minimum temperature was as high as 7-8C in parts of S England. However, a following cold front gave some heavy rain across Ireland and Scotland overnight; however, E'ward progress of this rain was slowed as the front reversed direction across Scotland later in the day. As a result once the early warm front had cleared, much of Cent ad E England had a mainly dry day - but the prevailing warm sector and lingering cold front meant a rather cloudy day in all areas. (Hawarden 13.6C, Loch Glascarnoch 7.4C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 3.9C minimum, Cluanie Inn 68.6 mm, Magilligan 3.2 h.)

A cold front, initially across E Ireland and S Scotland on the 24th, made slow progress E'wards during the morning - and was followed by further rain-bearing fronts later in the day. Rainfall was widespread overnight over Ireland and in Wales and S Scotland - and was heavy in places. Ahead of the clearing cold front it was quite mild with temperatures reaching 13-14C around London and rainfall amounts in E England were generally low. Most places had sunny intervals at times during the day - and some places in SE England having over 6 h of bright sunshine. (St James Park 14.9C, Dalwhinnie 5.1C maximum, Eskdalemuir 0.5C minimum, Bridgefoot 27.4 mm, Manston 7.0 h.)

Low pressure close to W Ireland brought a breezy day with spells of rain to most areas during the 25th. Most places had falls of rain overnight and being a generally cloudy night meant little ground frost was reported. During the day much of the rain was heaviest in W areas - and also across S England. However, all areas had some sunny intervals in between the bouts of rain - particularly in parts of N and Cent Scotland. (Cardiff Bute Park 11.6C, Dalwhinnie 4.9C maximum, Baltasound 1.9C minimum, Achnagart 28.8 mm, Kinloss 8.5 h.)

Parts of England had a slight ground frost overnight into the 26th with overnight rainfall being mainly confined to Scotland and NE Ireland. Further rainfall affected Scotland during the day - with much of E Ireland, England and Wales having a sunny day, despite some showery outbreaks. In the late afternoon and evening an area of more general rain pushed into W Ireland, later reaching S Scotland, Wales and SW England by midnight. (Gravesend 12.5C, Spadeadam 5.4C maximum, Shoreham -0.3C minimum, Achnagart 41.4 mm, Wattisham 8.7 h.)

Frontal cloud and rain moved rapidly E'wards across the British Isles on the 27th giving some rainfall overnight and during the morning to all areas. Following troughs and associated bands of rain affected many areas during the day although all areas saw some sunshine - except for some places in N Scotland. In the evening a depression heading towards S Ireland brought frontal rain to here and SW England; MSL pressure at 2400 GMT fell to 989.6 mb at Cork Airport. (Shoeburyness 12.0C, Dalwhinnie 5.2C maximum, Killylane 1.5C minimum, Tyndrum 21.0 mm, Shawbury 8.4h.)

Ahead of some rain in the SW, most places reported an overnight ground frost on the 28th with an air frost in E and S Scotland, NE Ireland and parts of N England. By dawn there had been some heavy falls of rain across S Ireland (20 mm in 12 hours ending 0600 GMT at Shannon Airport), S Wales and S England - with another area of rain affecting W Scotland. To the N of the rain in S Ireland there was some sleet or snow observed as the rain met colder air. After early mist and fog in the Midlands and N England the rain in the S moved N and E - but giving mainly light falls during the day over England and Wales. W Scotland continued to be affected by rain during the day while in E Scotland it was quite a sunny day. There were reports of a funnel cloud being observed to the NE of Shoreham Airport around 1330 GMT. (Killowen 11.8C, Stowe 4.4C maximum, Aboyne -4.1C minimum, Culdrose 20.0 mm, Dyce 9.0 h.)

British Isles weather, March 2014

There was a widespread ground frost into the 1st with many places also having a slight air frost. Overnight precipitation was mainly confined to SE England and to W parts of Ireland and Scotland; over much of Cent England early mist and fog patches were widespread. The rain in the W moved slowly E'wards during the day to reach W wales, Cornwall and parts of E Scotland by the evening. As temperatures fell in the evening some sleet and snow was reported falling in S Scotland. Once early mist and fog had cleared there were long sunny spells for many parts of Cent England - and also in E Scotland. (Pershore College 11.0C, Dalwhinnie 4.8C maximum, Topcliffe -4.9C minimum, Tiree 19.4 mm, Kirkwall 9.8 h.)

Parts of E Britain and N Ireland had a slight air frost on the 2nd; rain fell across much of Scotland overnight and later across much of England and Wales - resulting in rather cloudy skies. During the day further spells of rain affected mainly Ireland and the W half of Britain; some sleet and hail also fell over the Northern Isles for a time in the morning. In E Britain falls of precipitation were mostly light while the best of any sunshine was to be found in places from SW Ireland to E Scotland, in between rainfall events. (Weybourne 10.9C, Dalwhinnie 4.9C maximum, Santon Downham -3.6C minimum, Capel Curig 23,4 mm, Kinloss 6.1 h.)

An area of low pressure moved from W Ireland to Devon during the morning of the 3rd (central MSL pressure 979 mb over N Devon at 1200 GMT). Ahead of this there was an air frost across N Ireland and N Wales while much of Britain had widespread overnight rainfall. As the low moved away to the S, so too did the rain and most areas then had a sunny day - although NE Scotland remained rather dull. Showers in SE England were thundery in places. (Holbeach and Marham 10.6, Liscombe 5.1C maximum, Katesbridge -5.3C minimum, Odiham 21.0 mm, Rostherne 9.8 h.)

Air pressure remained generally low on the 4th with frontal rain giving some moderately heavy falls overnight in W Scotland; there was also some light snow overnight in parts of N Scotland that continued until around midday in places. Further S there was some light rain and drizzle overnight in parts of Wales and W England - and also around the Thames estuary. Many E areas of Britain had an air frost with mist and some fog patches across E England by dawn. Visibility soon improved in these E areas although rain continued to fall across parts of Scotland during the day - with falls also in Cornwall and SW England. Away from the rain there was broken cloud and sunny periods in most places. (Helens Bay 11.7C, Dalwhinnie 5.7C maximum, Aboyne -4.3C minimum, Tyndrum 23.4 mm, Valley 9.3 h.)

While a weak ridge of high pressure developed across S England on the 5th, fronts brought rain progressively E'wards across W areas during the day. May parts of England and some places in E Scotland had a slight air frost overnight but by dawn rain was falling over W Scotland - with mist and fog patches in Cent and E England by this time. The rain spread into Cent Scotland and NW England, and across W Ireland, by the early evening and these areas consequently had a rather cloudy day. With cloud cover generally increasing from the W, it was East Anglia, SE England and the Channel Islands that had the sunniest conditions. (Frittenden 14.1C, Dalwhinnie 6.3C maximum, Santon Downham -3.6C minimum, Achnagart 40.2 mm, St Helier 10.2 h.)

Rain-bearing fronts affected most areas of the British Isles on the 6th with cloudy skies resulting in almost no ground frost anywhere. Falls of rain in E and Cent England were mainly slight - following the clearance of some early mist from SE England. Only in the extreme SE corner of England and the Channel islands was there much sunshine during the day. (Gravesend 15.5C, Dalwhinnie 6.1C maximum, Alice Holt Lodge 2.0C minimum, Eskdalemuir 28.8 mm, Manston and St Helier 9.6 h.)

A cold front pushed SE'wards across most areas on the 7th, introducing colder air that led to some falls of sleet and snow later in the day across some of the higher ground of Scotland. Although frontal rain was quite heavy in places overnight - especially in parts of S Scotland and Wales - precipitation amounts declined as the cold front edged SE'wards during the day, with the rain giving way to showery conditions over Scotland and parts of Ireland. Temperatures reached 15-16C around London and there was thunder in a few of the blustery, wintry showers over northern Scotland. (St James Park 16.9C, Dalwhinnie 3.3C maximum, Tain Range 0.8C minimum, Bridgefoot 38.4 mm, Casement Aerodrome 8.5 h.)

High pressure (MSL pressure close to 1029 mb in East Anglia at 0000 GMT) towards the S early on the 8th gave way to a warm sector and a mainly S'ly flow in all areas by the end of the day. W parts of Ireland and Scotland had light rain at times with a cold front spreading E'wards here later in the day. Many places away from the overnight rain had an early ground frost and there was a slight air frost in some parts of E Britain. Ahead of the front it was then a rather cloudy day across Scotland and Ireland but, after some early mist and fog patches in S England, it was quite a sunny day in S England and the Channel Islands. (St James Park 16.6C, Dalwhinnie 7.9C maximum, Redesdale Camp -2.1C minimum, Achnagart 15.4 mm, Camborne and St Helier 10.4 h.)

The cold front made little progress E'wards on the 9th and any rainfall was mainly confined to W Scotland and Ireland - until the evening when some light falls of rain and drizzle occurred in W Wales, E Scotland and N England. Much of England had a hazy start to the day with a slight ground frost; temperatures then rose in the sunshine to reach 20C around the London area - an unusually high temperature for the time of year. Many parts of E and S England had in excess of 10 h of bright sunshine. (Gravesend 20.5C, Salsburgh 6.1C maximum, Shobdon 0.1C minimum, Lusa 17.2 mm, Wattisham 10.7 h.)

Overnight into the 10th rain affected Scotland and N England with some light falls in E Ireland and W Wales. Elsewhere there was widespread mist and fog by dawn with many places having a touch of ground frost. As high pressure developed (MSL pressure 1037 mb close to Durham by 2400 GMT) during the day any rainfall tended to die out and the day was mainly dry - albeit cloudy in places due to a decaying front in S areas. (Lee-on-Solent 17.7C, St Bees Head 7.4C maximum, Katesbridge -3.1C minimum, Carterhouse 6.6 mm, Morecambe 10.8 h.)

Continuing high pressure led to a mostly dry day on the 11th with an E'ly flow in S Britain. Mist and fog patches occurred in places by dawn and there was an inland air frost away from Cent and S England. Away from S England and the extreme N and NW parts of Scotland it was a very sunny day. (Aboyne 15.4C, Liscombe 5.8C maximum, Katesbridge -4.8C minimum, Wainfleet 0.2 mm, Morecambe 11.1 h.)

High pressure again dominated the weather on the 12th with a widespread ground frost by dawn and with much of Scotland having an air frost. Mist and fog patches were widespread across England, Wales and Ireland by dawn; it was to remain foggy in places until late morning - and stayed mostly misty all day in places with fog returning again in the evening in places as far N as Cent Scotland. A little frontal rain and drizzle fell in parts of W Scotland in the evening - across E Scotland it was a very sunny day. (Bala 17.1C, Shobdon 6.6C maximum, Aboyne -6.5C minimum, Thorney Island 0.4 mm, Kinloss 10.7 h.)

high pressure remained centred over the British Isles on the 13th, tending to weaken a frontal system that lay across Scotland. Mist and fog, thick in places, was widespread by dawn - by which time some light rain and drizzle was falling over N Scotland. In a few places, mainly across England, there was a light air frost overnight. It remained largely dry but hazy all day - with mist and fog persisting for much of the day in places before thickening across England into the evening. Much of Scotland and Ireland were cloudy due to the frontal cloud - with parts of E England having the best of the sunshine. (Kew Gardens 19.0C, Morecambe 5.5C maximum, Leeming -4.8C minimum, Resallach 2.0 mm, Wattisham 9.9 h.)

During the 14th high pressure migrated S'wards away from the UK and a W'ly flow became established. Early mist and fog, thick in places, was widespread by dawn and was slow to clear during the day - although by the evening was mostly confined to S England and S Wales. Overnight, rain fell across N and W Scotland while much of England and Wales had a ground frost with a slight air frost in places. Most places had a dull day as frontal cloud spread S'wards although falls of rain were slight except in N Scotland. (Hampton Water Works 17.7C, Cardinham 6.8C maximum, Sennybridge -2.5C minimum, Cluanie Inn 31.8 mm, Heathrow 9.5 h.)

Cloudy skies, with mist in S England, meant a mainly mild night into the 15th.Some rain fell across Scotland overnight - with more in the N here during the day. Elsewhere any falls were mostly light as pressure remained high to the SW of Ireland (MSL pressure 1033 mb at Valentia at 2400 GMT). Temperatures reached 17C in the London area with mush of S Ireland, Wales and Cent and S England having a sunny day. (St James Park 19.3C, Spadeadam 7.9C maximum, Shoreham 3.6C minimum, Cassley 10.2 mm, Cork Airport 10.4 h.) /p>

A W'ly surface flow around high pressure to the S on the 16th made for a mostly dry day across S parts of the British Isles. However, frontal cloud across Scotland gave some light rain and drizzle here early in the day - and this then spread S'wards to give light precipitation at times across Cent Ireland and N England by the evening. Much of England, and parts of E Scotland, did however manage to have quite a sunny day. (St James Park 20.1C, Spadeadam 8.1C maximum, Shawbury 2.5C minimum, Resallach 7.4 mm, Manston 11.4 h.)

MSL pressure at 0000 GMT on the 17th was close to 1028 mb in SW Ireland and this high pressure resulted in some mist patches across S England by dawn. Cloudy skies led to a generally mild night with moderately heavy rain in W Scotland and lighter falls as far S as N England and Cent Ireland overnight. During the day moderately-heavy rain was confined to an area from SW Ireland to the Northern Isles - although most other places managed some sunny intervals during this cloudy day. (Dyce 15.3C, Fair Isle 7.3C maximum, Benson 0.3C minimum, Cassley 16.6 mm, Herstmonceux 6.2 h.)

During the 18th frontal systems moved E'wards across all areas. Rain fell overnight mostly across Scotland, Ireland and N England but also as far S as Cent S England. Cloudy skies meant no early air frosts while during the day falls of rain were widespread in Wales, N England, N Ireland and across Scotland. There were sunny intervals between the spells of rain with light falls of rain and drizzle in parts of Cent and S England. A thundery shower developed over the Peak District around 1400 GMT and then moved towards Norfolk. (Hurn 15.1C, Baltasound 6.0C maximum, Santon Downham 2.0C minimum, Achnagart 25.8 mm, St Athan 6.5 h.)

Rainfall overnight into the 19th was mainly confined to Scotland and although the night was generally a mild one there were a few places with a ground frost in S parts of England and Wales. It was misty or foggy in places in SW England around dawn. During the day rainfall was mainly confined to N and NW Scotland with other areas remaining mostly dry in a mild SW'ly airflow. Despite the rather cloudy skies most places except in N Ireland, W and N Scotland had some sunny periods. (Kew Gardens 17.3C, Capel Curig 8.3C maximum, Exeter Airport 0.5C minimum, Kinlochewe 56.0 mm, St Helier 9.6 h.)

A cold front moved E'wards across all areas on the 20th. This gave heavy falls of rain overnight in W parts of Ireland and Scotland with further heavy falls during the day W of a line Hull-Dorset. East Anglia and SE England had a misty start to the day and then remained rather cloudy until frontal rain arrived here in the evening. In W areas, once the front had passed, there were sunny spells and some showers. These showers included isolated thunder in the evening over NW England, W and N Scotland and N Ireland. (Norwich Airport 16.4C, Dalwhinnie 4.7C maximum, Liscombe 3.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 79.2 mm, St Helier 9.2 h.)

There was an unsettled flow from the W across all areas on the 21st, with spells of further frontal rain and showers during the day, some of which were heavy and thundery with significant falls of hail in places. Showers were generally heaviest in W areas while across Scotland and parts of Ireland the temperature was low enough to gives falls of sleet or snow. The showery development was, in part, helped by sunny periods. In Southwell, Nottinghamshire, hail about the twice the size of peas fell during 1520-1530 GMT; road and pavements and gardens were completely covered by the hail and the temperature dropped from 11C to 4.3C in less than 10 minutes - during frequent thunder. (Kew Gardens 13.3C, Dalwhinnie 2.3C maximum, Shobdon -1.2C minimum, Tyndrum 21.8 mm, St Helier 10.2 h.)

Overnight into the 22nd rain and showers were widespread across England and Wales, while in Scotland and N England there were falls of sleet and snow in places - with wintry falls also reported as far S as Cornwall before dawn. N Ireland and parts of Scotland had an air frost while many places (the SE corner of England being an exception) had a slight ground frost by dawn. Further rain and showers followed during the day in most areas with some sleet and snow in Scotland. There was some thunder in the showers over Northern Ireland and England while lightning struck railway signalling near Clapham Junction just after 1700 GMT. (Weybourne and Plymouth 10.8C, Tulloch Bridge and Spadeadam 4.5C maximum, Aboyne -5.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 19.0 mm, Filton 8.7 h.)

A slight ground frost was widespread across the UK on the 23rd with overnight precipitation being largely across Ireland, Wales and W Scotland - including falls of snow and sleet in parts of Wales and Scotland. During the day showers were widespread across the British Isles, becoming thundery over Wiltshire, and especially Hampshire, during the late morning and early afternoon. There was further thunder in showers from around the Humber across Lincolnshire, Suffolk, Essex and parts of Kent during the afternoon. There was some snow reported from Scottish stations during the morning with most places having sunny periods during the day in between the showers - which tended to fade later as a weak ridge developed from the S. (Swanage 11.7C, Dalwhinnie 4.0C maximum, Aboyne -1.7C minimum, Cluanie Inn 11.0 mm, Leuchars 10.1 h.)

A weak ridge on the 24th soon gave way in the SW to frontal systems that eventually gave rain across much of Wales, Ireland, the W Midlands, SW and Cent S England by late evening. The dawn dawned with a widespread - and in places a sharp - air frost across much of the UK and N Ireland. Grass minimum temperatures fell to -10C in places. In E and SE England there were also a few fog patches by dawn. By dawn rain had spread NE'wards into Cornwall and SW Ireland although not until late afternoon did it start clouding over in much of E England and parts of E Scotland. (Northolt 11.9C, Lake Vyrnwy 6.0C maximum, Redesdale Camp -6.8C minimum, Cardinham 14.6 mm, Leuchars 11.7 h.)

The movement of a low pressure system close to SW England led to a change of wind direction in many places from S to N during the 25th. Cloudy skies gave widespread rain overnight across much of Ireland, Wales and England and although this lessened in intensity during the day there were some falls in S Scotland later. A thundery shower was reported from the Dublin area in the late afternoon - and Ireland and W Wales were the sunniest areas during the day as the low headed SE'wards. Much of N and Cent England had a cloudy day. (Killowen 13.9C, Pennerley 5.6C maximum, Santon Downham -1.2C minimum, Leek 13.2 mm, Magilligan 9.7 h.)

Mist and fog patches were widespread by dawn on the 26th across much of England and Wales - while a few showers affected some E parts of England overnight. There was a widespread ground frost overnight with a slight air frost in some E districts. Most of the overnight rain fell in Wales and W Scotland from a W'ward-moving weak front. This front continued to move W'wards over Ireland during the day - and further rain and showers were brought W'wards during the day over E and Cent parts of the UK. The best of the sunshine was to be found over areas of E Scotland where there were long, sunny spells while some thundery activity was reported in parts of the E Midlands and East Anglia. (Cardinham 12.4C, Pennerley 6.0C maximum, Dyce -3.9C minimum, Cambridge NIAB 7.0 mm, Lerwick 11.9 h.)

The 27th was a day with an E'ly surface flow. There was a slight air frost in a few parts of England and Wales overnight (ground frost was widespread across the British Isles) with rainfall across N England and S Scotland in particular. Much of Cent and E England was misty by dawn with a few fog patches. During the day an area of rain and showers moved W'wards across England and Wales with most other areas also seeing some lighter falls of rain at some time. Thundery showers, moving northwest or west, affected various parts of eastern and central Britain, mainly during the afternoon and evening. Mist and fog patches formed widely across much of England in the evening. (Herstmonceux 12.3C, Okehampton 4.9C maximum, Frittenden -3.0C minimum, Brize Norton 10.0 mm, Stornoway 10.2 h.)

Mist and fog patches were widespread across Cent and S England by dawn on the 28th and a ground frost was widespread overnight across the British Isles. An E'ly flow brought rainfall to many parts of England, Wales and E Ireland at times during the early hours with falls becoming more widespread during the day - also spreading W'wards across Ireland and affecting S Scotland. It remained hazy for much of the day across England and generally cloudy skies reduced the sunshine duration in most areas. Showers moving NW'wards from Cent S England turned thundery over Oxfordshire shortly after midday, and from there a line of active thunderstorms continued across the S and W Midlands - with isolated thundery outbreaks amongst the showers in the S and W during the afternoon and early evening. (Santon Downham 14.1C maximum, Carterhouse 3.9C maximum, Santon Downham 02.6C minimum, Emley Moor 24.2 mm, Tiree 9.8 h.)

The flow on the 29th was mainly from the SE throughout the day. Overnight precipitation fell mainly over Wales, SW England, S Scotland and parts of Ireland - with widespread mist and haze over much of England by dawn. Many places in England remained hazy during the day and rain and showers fell mainly in W parts of Britain and in Ireland during the day. In the evening there were reports of Saharan dust falling in precipitation in SW England. (St James Park 19.8C, Albemarle 6.4C maximum, Santon Downham -0.7C minimum, Milford Haven 12.4 mm, Reading University 10.5 h.)

On the 30th some places in N Ireland awoke to some lying Saharan dust by dawn as a continuing flow from the SE brought dustfalls in rain to W parts of the British Isles overnight. Much of England and E Scotland was misty or hazy by dawn - with fog in places. With much of the British Isles lying in a warm sector temperatures reached 20C in the London area and in parts of Norfolk. During the day most places remained dry with cent and S England, in particular, having a day with sunny periods. (Santon Downham 20.9C, Salsburgh 5.7C maximum, Aviemore -2.7C minimum, Glenanne 1.0 mm, Lerwick 11.7 h.)

Visibility was generally poor across the British Isles on the 31st with most of the UK having a dry start to the day. Frontal rain spread E'wards to affect much of Wales, SW England and the W Midlands by early evening - later moving into N England. Thunderstorms broke out off the NW Devon coast in the early afternoon and then moved across W Wales. There were also thundery outbreaks on the front over NW Ireland in the afternoon with occurrences in a few other places. Away from the rain, it stayed rather misty or hazy in E areas - with rather cloudy skies; the best of the sunshine was to be found across Cent Scotland. (Porthmadog 19.2C, Salsburgh 5.6C maximum, Altnaharra -1.0C minimum, Porthmadog 18.8 mm, Dyce 8.6 h.)

British Isles weather, April 2014

During the morning of the 1st an area of rain moved N'wards, introducing a widespread area of (in place, thick) fog to much of S England, S Wales and the Midlands. At least 95 flights were cancelled after thick fog enveloped Heathrow Airport. The fog also affected several flights leaving from Cardiff Airport, many of which were delayed while some were diverted to other airports. By 0600 GMT the rain was widespread across much of Scotland and in places across S wales and the Midlands the fog lingered until late morning. In the afternoon the rain largely cleared E'wards from E Scotland while another rain area affected SW Ireland in the evening. By midnight mist and some fog patches had formed in E Ireland and in parts of N and Cent England - after a warm day in the London area with temperatures around 20C. (Gravesend 20.5C, Salsburgh 5.7C maximum, Libanus 0.7C minimum, Levens Hall 19.2 mm, Manston 10.7 h.)

It was a mild night in SW England and S Wales into the 2nd with overnight minimum temperatures above 11C in places. By dawn rain in SW Ireland had spread across much of Ireland and into SW England - 11 mm of rain fell at Sherkin Island in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT. Ahead of the rain there was widespread mist and haze across England and Wales - during the day the rain moved NE'wards, later reaching S Scotland; falls during the day were mostly slight. It remained rather misty/hazy during the day across England and Wales and it was a mostly dull day - with just NW Scotland having much sunshine. (Frittenden 21.0C, Spadeadam 5.2C maximum, Altnaharra -3.4C minimum, Derrylin Cornahoule 14.4 mm, Stornoway 11.7 h.)

The 3rd was a generally cloudy day with bands of rain affecting most areas at times. Ireland, Wales and England also had a rather misty start to the day, with fog patches in places; although any fog generally cleared during the morning it remained misty/hazy in much of England and Wales during the day. (Northolt 20.0C, Inverbervie 5.9C maximum, Baltasound 1.6C minimum, Winchcombe Sudeley Castle 14.8 mm, Manston 3.6 h.)

The 4th was another unsettled day. Overnight rain was largely confined to Scotland, Wales and W England. England and Wales also had widespread misty conditions, with some fog patches, by dawn - although as the rain spread N'wards so did the poor visibility. Rainfall during the day was mostly confined to Scotland although another area of rainfall affected SW Ireland in the evening - later spreading into Cornwall before midnight. As the early rainfall moved away N'wards it turned brighter from the SW, although Scotland and E England remained rather dull. (Giants Causeway 15.7C, Inverbervie 6.4C maximum, Braemar 4.5C minimum, Salsburgh 19.8 mm, Bude 5.7 h.)

A warm sector was introduced across all but N Scotland on the 5th. E Britain and S England had early mist and fog patches before an area of rain spread across most areas from the SW. It was a rather dull day in all places - with the exception of parts of East Anglia, Kent and NE Scotland where there were some sunny periods. (Santon Downham 17.9C, Dundrennan 9.0C maximum, Aboyne -1.5C minimum, Capel Curig 16.6 mm, Manston 9.4 h.)

Rainfall was widespread across the British Isles into the 6th, with only parts of NE Scotland remaining dry. Overnight minimum temperatures were widely in the range 10-12C. During the day much of E England was mainly dry but elsewhere rainfall was a feature of the weather. Temperatures reached 17-18C in parts of N Scotland with Scotland and Ireland having spells of sunshine as the rain gradually became confined to Cent and S England. (Boulmer 18.5C, Baltasound 9.8C maximum, Tain Range 5.2C minimum, Capel Curig 35.4 mm, Casement Aerodrome 7.6 h.)

A wave depression moved from S Ireland the Shetland during the 7th; the associated fronts led to a wet start to the day in S and Cent England before the rain moved N'wards to affect most places. It was a mild night in places S of a line Hull-Cardiff; temperatures remained above 12C in much of East Anglia overnight but only rose 2-3 degC during the day here. Cloudy skies caused this small diurnal temperature range - much of E and Cent England had a dull day with the best of the sunshine being across Ireland and in SW Scotland. (Leconfield 16.3C, Carterhouse 7.2C maximum, Aboyne -0.6C minimum, Wych Cross 29.8 mm, Tiree 6.2 h.)

Pressure built to the S on the 8th - a day with a mainly W'ly surface flow across the British Isles. MSL pressure reached 1028.8 mb at Guernsey Airport by 2400 GMT. There was some, mainly light, rainfall over across Scotland with lesser outbreaks elsewhere although most places E of a line Malin Head-Dorset had some falls during the day, much of it due to a troughline. After a cool start - there was an early ground frost in Cent Scotland - temperatures failed to rise much during the day, despite many areas having in excess of 9 h of bright sunshine. (St James Park 14.6C, Cluanie Inn 8.4C maximum, Katesbridge -0.5C minimum, Cluanie Inn 10.2 mm, St Helier 11.6 h.)

Despite the presence of high pressure to the S on the 9th, frontal cloud gave cloudy conditions across N Scotland in particular during the day. The high pressure led to an early ground frost in Cent, S and E parts of England. Rain affected W and N Scotland overnight and during the day, with heavy falls in places. Further S the high pressure meant a bright day - with a cool start to the day in much of Cent and parts of S England. However a cold front to the W of Ireland did lead to a rather cloudy day across most of Ireland. (St James Park 17.8C, Aultbea 9.6C maximum, Shoreham 0.1C minimum, Resallach 34.6 mm, Aberporth 11.1 h.)

During the 10th a weakening cold front pushed SE'wards across Ireland, Scotland and later N England. There was a widespread ground frost in Cent, S and E England before dawn with the front giving rain in N Scotland and NW Ireland. Rain fell further S during the day in Ireland and later in N England - while after the rain it turned bright and sunny across NE Scotland. (St James Park 17.5C, Logan Botanic Garden 9.2C maximum, South Newington 0.4C minimum, Achnagart 18.6 mm, Tiree 12.5 h.)

There was a widespread ground frost before dawn on the 11th, except across S England and East Anglia (areas ahead of the cold front). Little rain fell from this front as it moved S'wards during the day - but by mid-afternoon rain was falling across much of Scotland from a series of fronts over and off NW Britain. This rain made little progress S'wards during the evening and, although Ireland was rather cloudy, across much of England and Wales it was a sunny day. (Lee-on-Solent 17.5C, Resallach 7.8C maximum, Aboyne -3.2C minimum, Harris Quidnish 9.6 mm, St Helier 10.4 h.)

A pair of cold fronts crossed most areas on the 12th in a SE'ly direction. They gave some heavy rain overnight in parts of W and N Scotland - although during the day the rain spread little outside Scotland and Ireland as the fronts weakened. There was some early mist and fog in parts of E England, and a ground frost in much of Cent and S England. A day with broken cloud then followed in the S, ahead of the fronts - with sunny spells behind the fronts in the N. (Frittenden 16.3C, Resallach 7.9C maximum, Sennybridge 1.0C minimum, Kinlochewe 31.6 mm, Stornoway 8.0 h.)

Further fronts spread SE'wards across most areas on the 13th, ahead of an area of high pressure that lead to MSL pressure of about 1027 mb in SW Ireland by 2400 GMT. The fronts gave some rain overnight in Scotland, and later in N England - while many parts of Cent and S England had a slight ground frost before dawn. Although there was further rain across Scotland during the day, there were only slight falls elsewhere - while much of S and Cent England had a very sunny day ahead of the fronts. (St James Park 17.4C, Loch Glascarnoch 7.1C maximum, South Newington 0.5C minimum, Cluanie Inn 40.6 mm, St Athan 12.8 h.)

A large area of high pressure moved NE'wards across the British Isles on the 14th - being centred at 1031 mb over Northumberland by 2400 GMT. Some rain and drizzle before dawn over N Scotland soon moved away E'wards but most places had a dry and sunny day - sunshine totals were widely in the range 10-12 h. (Lee-on-Solent 18.1C, Fair Isle 7.3C maximum, Katesbridge 0.2C minimum, Resallach 7.2 mm, Boulmer 13.0 h.)

High pressure persisted across the British Isles on the 15th, being centred close to E England, with a mostly dry day resulting as a result. Scotland had a widespread air frost before dawn - with further pockets of frost in places as far S as Cent S England; an early ground frost was widespread in all districts away from the coasts. There were a few fog patches in parts of England under the early clear skies - although across N Scotland there was more extensive cloud - and this lack of cloud led to a very sunny day from Cent Scotland S'wards. (Magilligan 17.2C, Lerwick 8.5C maximum, Aviemore -4.4C minimum, Wainfleet 0.2 mm, Lyneham 13.1 h.)

The area of high pressure slipped away E'wards during the 16th allowing fronts to move SE'wards across Scotland later in the day. S Scotland E Ireland and much of England and Wales had an early ground frost with patches of air frost in places - but cloudy skies in W areas of Scotland and Ireland led to a mostly mild here. During the afternoon cloud spread S'wards into N England as rain affected N and W areas of Scotland. In the evening this rain spread further S into Cent Ireland, e Scotland and N England. However, across Cent and S areas of England it was another very sunny day - while sunless conditions prevailed in W and N Scotland. (Northolt 18.2C, Fair Isle 8.3C maximum, Santon Downham -3.3C minimum, Lusa 13.0 mm, Wattisham 13.1 h.)

A N'ly flow was introduced across most areas on the 17th as a pair of fronts moved S'wards across the British Isles. However, except for falls over Scotland, the fronts gave little precipitation as they moved S'wards. Cloudy skies meant that early ground frost was largely confined to S England - there was some early sunshine here but the largest sunshine amounts occurred in the N'ly flow across Scotland behind the fronts. (Frittenden 19.4C, Loch Glascarnoch 7.8C maximum, Exeter Airport 0.0C minimum, Cassley 20.4 mm, Stornoway 10.8 h.)

On the 18th the N'ly flow gave way to a weak area of high pressure from the W, resulting in another mostly dry day. Away from S parts of England, Wales and Ireland there was a widespread ground frost before dawn - along with a widespread air frost across Scotland. A dry and bright day then followed for most places although N Scotland and W Ireland had a little more cloud than many inland areas. A foehn wind led to a mild afternoon in E Scotland. (Aboyne 17.4C, Loftus 8.1C maximum, Tulloch Bridge -4.3C minimum, Tyndrum 0.4 mm, Leuchars 13.5 h.)

Despite high pressure across E and S parts of the British Isles, there was a little precipitation during the 19th due to the proximity of a front close to NW areas of the British Isles. Parts of Britain had an early air frost, while ground frost was widespread away from the coasts and the N of Scotland. The highest temperatures were again to be found in parts of Scotland - while much of England, Wales and Ireland had cloud cover that held down the sunshine totals when compared to S Scotland. (Achnagart 18.6C, Lake Vyrnwy 9.0C maximum, Ravensworth -4.5C minimum, South Uist 6.0 mm, Edinburgh Gogarbank 13.5 h.)

The 20th saw an area of low pressure moved W'wards across S England, while pushing fronts towards the N and W during the day; these fronts affected N England and parts of Ireland later in the day. Overnight it was generally dry - except across the Channel Islands; Scotland had a widespread ground frost with an air frost in places. Many parts of the British Isles had a misty start to the day, especially England, and these misty conditions failed to clear as the frontal rain moved through. Cloud from the low made for a dull day across England and Wales - although in Scotland and Ireland it was very sunny in most places. There were scattered thundery outbreaks amongst the areas of rain over England and Wales - principally over the Berkshire Downs towards Swindon in the late morning. (Aviemore 19.0C, Okehampton 8.0C maximum, Aboyne -5.2C minimum, Dunkeswell 25.6 mm, Kinloss 14.1 h.)

W'ward-moving low centres continued to dominate conditions in S Britain on the 21st. Clearer skies in Scotland meant an early ground frost here while rain affected Wales and S Ireland in particular overnight. There was a misty start to the day across much of England, with fog patches in places; further outbreaks of frontal rain affected many parts of England during the day - with some heavy falls in places. It was a warm day across much of England and Wales, and also parts of Scotland with temperatures of 19-20C in places. This was despite cloud that held the sunshine totals down in many areas during the day. Thunderstorms affected parts of southern Britain during the afternoon and early evening: the main outbreak tracked WSW across Oxfordshire, Gloucestershire, Hereford and Worcester, Powys and Dyfed to near Fishguard. (Bridgefoot 20.9C, Lerwick 7.1C maximum, Altnaharra -2.0C minimum, Heathrow 16.4 mm, Stornoway 13.2 h.)

The winds turned from E'ly to S'ly on the 22nd - which was an unsettled day in most areas due to several frontal systems. Overnight rain across England was followed by rain and drizzle in ost areas during the day. There was a short-lived thunderstorm in the vicinity of Exmoor in the late afternoon. Cloudy skies meant little air frost away from parts of NE Scotland, while misty conditions (with a few fog patches) across England and E Scotland during the morning returned during the evening. (Gravesend 17.3C, Salsburgh 8.1C maximum, Braemar -1.5C minimum, Alice Holt Lodge 28.0 mm, Stornoway 8.8 h.)

The unsettled S'ly flow continued during the 23rd. Skies were rather cloudy overnight with outbreaks of rain across Scotland, Ireland and Wales, and with widespread mist and a few fog patches in England and E Scotland overnight. Rainfall during the day was largely confined to Ireland, Wales and SW England; there was thunder amongst the showers in Ireland during the afternoon, especially in Cent and NE regions. A little precipitation fell, especially later in the day, in E Scotland and E England. The best of the sunshine was to be found in SW Ireland and the extreme SE of England with many other areas having a rather dull day. (Gravesend 18.9C, Fair Isle 7.9C maximum, Alice Holt Lodge 3.9C minimum, Bude 21.8 mm, Cork Airport 9.6 h.)

Although winds remained generally S'ly on the 24th, there was a slight rise in air pressure due to a Scandinavian high. Overnight rain was mainly confined to Scotland and E England - this moved gradually E'wards during the day with little precipitation except across E and N Scotland as a result. Wales, SE Ireland and parts of SW England had a slight ground frost, while E England dawned rather misty. The mist cleared by midday but returned by midnight in E Scotland and much of England - with thick fog in places then. W areas of the British Isles had a few showers. A sferic was coincident with a shower in the Newport Pagnell area shortly before 2000 GMT. Except over the Northern Isles, most places had sunny periods for a time during the day - especially in places bordering the N half of the Irish Sea, and in SW Scotland. (Wisley 18.5C, Fair Isle 8.0C maximum, Katesbridge 0.9C minimum, Pateley Bridge Ravens Nest 9.6 mm, Tiree 12.1 h.)

By 2400 GMT on the 25th MSL pressure had fallen to about 987 mb in SW Ireland as a deepening depression headed towards Valentia. There was a misty start to the day across much of Britain, with a ground frost most noticeably in E Ireland and N Scotland. There was some light rain overnight in E England and E Scotland and this rain persisted for much of the day - heavy at times in places, although it tended to leave SE England and the SE Midlands in the evening. By 2100 GMT Cork was reporting continuous heavy rain ahead of the low. E Ireland had a sunny day; elsewhere it was cloudy with mist and fog patches in the evening across England, even once the rain had started to clear. A thundery outbreak moved NNW from West Sussex across east and north Hampshire, east Berkshire and south Oxfordshire in the morning. There was also thunder near the cold front along the coast of Humberside and North Yorkshire in the late evening. (Whitechurch 17.2C, Inverbervie 7.2C maximum, Dalwhinnie -1.2C minimum, Alice Holt Lodge 33.8 mm, Thomastown 9.8 h.)

A low pressure centre moved slowly from SW Ireland towards Cornwall during the 26th with its associated fronts gradually spiralling outwards and N'wards across the British Isles. Overnight most places had rainfall from at least one frontal system - with some heavy falls over Scotland and S Ireland. Rainfall amounts during the day were generally less with most places, except in S Ireland and NE Scotland, having sunny intervals from time to time. NE Scotland, Ireland and the SW corner of England and Wales were the wettest places during the day. There was some thunder over eastern Scotland during the early hours as the cold front continued its northward movement. In the evening E Scotland in particular saw mist and fog patches forming. (Bridgefoot 17.5C, Inverbervie 8.9C maximum, Shap 4.4C minimum, Cardinham 27.4 mm, Shawbury 7.5h.)

A filling area of low pressure remained just to the S of England during the 27th as it slowly moved away E'wards. Rainfall, including showers, during the day was mostly confined to Wales, SW and Cent S England. Shetland, W Scotland and N and cent Ireland had a sunny day - in E Britain it remained rather cloudy with poor visibility in many places here for much of the day. Thunder developed in some of the showers late in the day, principally over Wales and Cent and SW Ireland, with one or two over the S Midlands. (Kinlochewe 19.3C, Loftus 9.1C maximum, Castlederg 1.8C minimum, Okehampton 16.4 mm, Tiree 13.9 h.)

The 28th was a generally cloudy day with misty conditions, especially before dawn and in the evening, in many places - with some thick fog by midnight in parts of England and Scotland. Rainfall amounts were generally small, occurring largely in S Scotland and NE England overnight, and in parts of SW and Cent S England during the day. As showers moved westwards across southern counties they turned thundery, especially over central southern and southwest England during the afternoon and early evening; 16 mm fell in one hour at Hurn. Despite a cool start in N Scotland, it was N and cent Scotland that had the highest temperatures during the day; at Altnaharra the temperature rose from a minimum of 1.1C to a maximum of 20.9C. (Aviemore 22.0C, Lerwick 8.8C maximum, Kinbrace -0.6C minimum, Hurn 17.6 mm, Dyce 13.7 h.)

Mist and fog were widespread at 0600 GMT on the 29th across the British Isles although this largely cleared by midday. Overnight rainfall was mainly confined to S Wales and SW England ;an area of thundery showers drifted WSW across Hampshire in the afternoon. A man was reportedly thrown 12 feet in the air when lightning struck close to where he and two colleagues were unloading a lorry at a building site in Camberley (where the outbreak appears to have started) just before 1pm. Isolated thunder may have occurred elsewhere in the south and it was S England that saw almost all the rainfall during the day before mist and fog returned to many areas of the British Isles again in the evening. (Portglenone 20.0C, Fair Isle 7.2C maximum, Kinbrace 1.4C minimum, Reading University 14.4 mm, Shannon Airport 13.7 h.)

Overnight precipitation was mainly light into the 30th although it was fairly widespread across Scotland and Ireland due to a pair of fronts. Further falls continued in these areas during the day with England and Wales, despite some mist and fog being slow to clear in places, having a largely dry day. It was a cool day in E Scotland with temperatures failing to rise above 9C in many places - in contrast to warmer conditions in Cent and S England where 15C was widely attained. Thundery showers affected Pennine regions late in the day. It was a dull day across Scotland. (Gravesend 20.7C, Kinbrace 6.3C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 1.6C minimum, Gringley On The Hill 19.6 mm, Heathrow 11.0 h.)

British Isles weather, May 2014

A complex area of low pressure over S areas on the 1st led to a widely unsettled day. As high pressure built from the N it turned drier across Scotland during the day, after a wet night here. Other areas were wet by night and day although by late evening it was mostly dry across all areas England - with mist patches forming over S England. Across N Scotland it was a sunny day. (Cardiff Bute Park 17.0C, Carterhouse 4.5C maximum, Braemar 1.3C minimum, Frittenden 18.6 mm, Lerwick 12.7 h.)

High pressure developed across E Britain during the 2nd (1031 mb close to Newcastle by 22400 GMT) as frontal systems crossed E'wards over Ireland during the day. Under the high pressure there was a widespread ground frost over N Scotland by dawn with air minima widely down to -3C. Ahead of the high there was a little rain and drizzle early in the day in parts of E England - while rain and drizzle affected parts of Ireland in the evening. (Lee-on-Solent 15.1C, Lerwick 7.5C maximum, Altnaharra -4.3C minimum, Hampstead 4.6 mm, Stornoway 14.2 h.)

High pressure was slow-moving on the 3rd, with a centre of 1027 mb at 2400 GMT over Kent. As a result overnight rainfall was largely confined to W Ireland (with about 5 mm falling in places) - while in much of Scotland and England there was a ground frost before dawn. Grass minimum temperatures in W Wales and SW England were close to 10C, however. Light rain and drizzle continued to affect Ireland during the day - with falls also occurring over W Scotland later in the afternoon, and then across Scotland generally in the evening. Much of Cent and S England had a sunny day. (Aviemore 16.6C, Drumalbin 8.9C maximum, Topcliffe -3.9C minimum, South Uist 6.8 mm, Heathrow 13.3 h.)

There was a NW-SE split to the weather conditions on the 4th, with cloud and rain across Scotland and, at times, parts of Ireland and N England, and mainly dry conditions elsewhere. East Anglia and SE England had a slight ground frost before the anticyclone slipped away SE'wards while East Anglia and S England had the best of the sunshine during the day; other areas remained rather cloudy. (Dyce 18.0C, Lerwick 8.1C maximum, Santon Downham -1.8C minimum, Achnagart 12.6 mm, Wattisham 12.9 h.)

Parts of the Midlands, S England and East Anglia again had a slight ground frost on the 5th as overnight rain affected Scotland and W Ireland. England and Wales also had widespread mist or fog by dawn - this soon cleared to give some sunshine before frontal cloud and rain over Ireland then spread E'wards during the day. By mid-evening only SE England and East Anglia remained dry. (Cambridge NIAB 19.8C, Fair Isle 10.0C maximum, South Newington 0.0C minimum, Tiree 8.0 mm, Wattisham 9.9 h.)

The 6th was an unsettled day with fronts giving spells of rain in places from time to time. Rainfall was widespread overnight with the cloud keeping minimum temperatures above 10C across much of England. During the day much of the rain fell across Ireland and Scotland - with falls in W England around midnight as a cold front moved E'wards. Temperatures reached 19C in parts of SE England ahead of the front - and many parts of England and long sunny periods before the frontal cloud arrived. (Gravesend 19.7C, Lerwick 8.7C maximum, Altnahinch Filters 5.2C minimum, Fylingdales 12.4 mm, Valley 11.6 h.)

A cloudy, W'ly flow affected all areas on the 7th. Overnight rain was widespread across Scotland in particular - but there were further falls further S in parts of Ireland, England and Wales. During the day rainfall was again widespread, and heavy in places, across Scotland - while elsewhere there were sunny periods and a few spells of showery rain. (Northolt 18.0C, Tulloch Bridge 8.7C maximum, Lerwick 4.4C minimum, Dunstaffnage 26.8 mm, Shawbury 7.3 h.)

More unsettled weather affected the British Isles on the 8th; clear skies led to some light ground frost in parts of E Scotland while overnight rainfall was widespread in S and W Ireland and later in S Wales and SW England. During the day this rain then spread across England and Wales with heavy falls in places. E Scotland and parts of Ireland had a little sunshine - although the day was generally a cloudy one in all areas. (Exeter Airport 17.2C, Lerwick 10.5C maximum, Aboyne 2.4C minimum, Scolton Country Park 17.0 mm, Cork Airport 5.7 h.)

Rainfall was widespread into the 9th across Scotland, N and Cent Ireland, and in N England. By midday this rain had largely cleared away towards the North Sea - although in the evening another area of low pressure (MSL pressure down to 996 mb in W Ireland by 2400 GMT) brought rain across Ireland and into W parts of England and Wales. In between the two rain areas most places had a day with sunny periods - although N Scotland remained generally dull with some heavy rain in places. (Manston 18.0C, Fair Isle 9.8C maximum, Killylane 5.1C minimum, Lusa 19.8 mm, Wittering 9.6 h.)

An area of low pressure moved across N Ireland and then Cent Scotland during the 10th bringing widespread rain overnight to all but N Scotland. Falls were heavy in places and continued with a more intermittent nature during the day across the British Isles. E and NE Scotland remained generally dull and cloudy; most other places had some sunshine during the day - especially the Channel Islands. (Writtle 18.7C, Lerwick 8.6C maximum, Aviemore 2.9C minimum, Capel Curig 51.2 mm, St Helier 8.7 h.)

During the 11th rainfall was largely confined to places N of a line Shannon-The Wash although places to the S did have some light rain overnight and a few scattered showers during the day. Falls across Wales were heavy in places again. With the rain areas and accompanying low tending to migrate E'wards during the day, it was W Scotland, S Ireland, Cornwall and the Channel Islands that had the best of the sunshine during the day; parts of E England and E Scotland remained rather dull. (Murlough 16.4C, Pennerley 8.6C maximum, Redesdale Camp 3.9C minimum, Capel Curig 39.0 mm, Stornoway 12.5 h.)

A shallow area of low pressure (1007 mb) was centred over S Scotland at 1200 GMT on the 12th. Associated troughs brought spells of rain to most places during the day. In N and E Scotland clear skies led to a slight air frost in places before dawn. During the day the best of the sunshine occurred across N Scotland with 10-14 h of bright sunshine in places; in the Channel Islands and S England some places had 10-12 h. (St James Park 18.0C, Carterhouse 9.4C maximum, Braemar -1.6C minimum, Castlederg 36.0 mm, Stornoway 14.5 h.)

Parts of E and N Scotland had a slight air frost overnight into the 13th while further S there were some falls of rain overnight leading to a little mist or fog in places by dawn. Showers and further falls of rain affected many areas during the day; amounts were generally small and it was largely dry in the W and in much of Ireland and SW England. (Lee-on-Solent 18.7C, Fair Isle 10.0C maximum, Aviemore -1.4C minimum, Nantwich 13.6 mm, Tiree 15.1 h.)

High pressure enveloped much of the British Isles on the 14th (MSL pressure close to 1036 mb over SW England by 2400 GMT) leading to mainly settled weather conditions. However, a weak front brought some cloud to N areas and a trough gave some rain in E England overnight. Mist and fog were widespread by dawn across England and parts of Wales - and much of Scotland had an overnight ground frost. The front also gave some rain and drizzle over Ireland during the morning - this then pushed into W and Cent areas of Scotland later in the day. These areas were, as a result, rather cloudy - although most places in England recorded over 10 h of bright sunshine as the pressure rose from the SW. (Lee-on-Solent 19.9C, Fair Isle 10.5C maximum, Altnaharra -3.0C minimum, Killowen 2.0 mm, Bude and St Helier 14.0 h.)

Cloudy skies into the 15th across Scotland meant a mild night here with some light rain and drizzle; during the day it was generally dry across Scotland, except for some light rain in the Northern Isles. After a touch of ground frost in places in England overnight, it was a mostly fine day outside Scotland under high pressure as the centre transferred towards East Anglia during the day. Parts of East Anglia and S England had some mist and fog around dawn - but away from N Scotland most places had sunny periods during the day, particularly in the Channel Islands and SW England. (Helens Bay 21.6C, Lerwick 10.1C maximum, Santon Downham 1.4C minimum, Baltasound 6.0 mm, Manston 14.2 h.)

During the 16th pressure fell across the British Isles as a cold front edged SE'wards during the day over Scotland. Parts of E Scotland had some light rain or drizzle before dawn, but the day was then mostly dry until mid-afternoon when the frontal rain began falling over NW Scotland. This rain area then moved SE'wards, with falls in N Ireland by midnight. Any early mist and fog across England and Wales cleared after dawn and a warm day then followed across England, with sunny periods in all areas of the British Isles (ahead of any frontal cloud) - and long spells of sunshine in S England. (Pershore College 23.7C, Harris Quidnish 12.3C maximum, Goudhurst 3.3C minimum, Achnagart 8.8 mm, St Helier 14.0 h.)

Pressure remained high during the 17th in SE England and the front across Scotland made little further progress. There was a little rain overnight in parts of W Scotland and NW Ireland while parts of Cent Scotland had a slight ground frost. Misty conditions over S England before dawn soon lifted and most of SE Ireland, Wales and England then had a sunny day. Elsewhere the day was a mostly cloudy one with rain in W Scotland and N and W Ireland; in places across W Scotland this rain was heavy at times. (Santon Downham 23.9C, Fair Isle 10.7C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 0.4C minimum, Achnagart 31.6 mm, Sheffield 14.3 h.)

There was a SW-NE split in the weather on the 18th. Overnight rain from the northern Isles to SW Ireland was heavy in places while, after a dry night, mist and haze were again present across much of S and E England by dawn. Much of England then had a warm and sunny day - while further rain affected much of Ireland, W and N Scotland during the day - and the associated cloud also affected E Scotland. There were thundery showers from about Morpeth to Berwick-on-Tweed around dusk, and on the eastern Aberdeenshire coast around midnight. (St James Park 24.5C, Dunstaffnage 10.2C maximum, Trawscoed 4.5C minimum, Dunstaffnage 33.8 mm, Odiham 13.9 h.)

Frontal systems affected W and SW parts of the British Isles on the 19th. Overnight, rain continued to affected Ireland, Wales and Scotland while mist and haze became widespread over England by dawn. Scattered thundery showers continued to affect northeast Scotland during the morning, and a few more broke out over northern England and Scotland in the afternoon. Thundery outbreaks drifting N'wards increasingly affected western regions during the day while rain also fell across Wales and SW England later in the day. After rain during the day across Scotland and Ireland, misty conditions were widespread here by midnight. Across much of England it was a warm day, with long sunny spells here away from W areas. (Heathrow 26.3C, Fair Isle 12.0C maximum, Shap 4.1C minimum, Valley 28.8 mm, Wattisham 14.2 h.)

Low pressure over W parts of the British Isles on the 20th resulted in a rather unsettled day. Many parts of Ireland and W and Cent Britain had some rainfall before dawn, although across Scotland the night was largely dry except in the SW. Further thundery activity affected parts of Wales and northern Irish Sea regions during the first few hours of the day, and a narrow band of rain with isolated thunder developed over the east Midlands shortly after daybreak and tracked northwest across the north Midlands to south Lancashire and then out across the Irish Sea. Another thundery outbreak moved NNW across Cornwall and west Devon, grazing SW Wales during the middle of the day and, after weakening over the sea, developed into a widespread thundery outbreak over SW Ireland during the afternoon. Scattered thundery showers affected parts of east and north Wales, northern England, west and north Scotland during the afternoon and evening. (Weybourne 24.9C, Fair Isle 9.7C maximum, Braemar 3.7C minimum, Valley 14.6 mm, Aviemore 8.9 h.)

A complex area of low pressure over the British Isles on the 21st meant unsettled weather in many areas. Parts of the S Midlands had a slight ground frost overnight while rainfall was widespread across Scotland and parts of N England. By dawn it was rather misty with some fog patches across England - during the day most of the rain fell across the N half of Scotland, although another rain area spread from the S coast of England across much of S England and East Anglia by midnight. E and S Ireland, along with Wales, the Midlands and N England had long sunny spells in places before the arrival of cloud from the S later. (Bramham 21.0C, Harris Quidnish 8.3C maximum, Exeter Airport 2.0C minimum, Harris Quidnish 23.6 mm, Valley 15.2 h.)

Low pressure remained centred close to S England and also close to N Scotland throughout the 22nd. As a result much of England, E Wales and N Scotland had rainfall overnight - while during the day most parts of the British Isles saw some rainfall at times. Sunshine amounts were rather limited - occurring mainly across S England later and also in parts of Ireland and W Scotland. An extensive area of heavy showers and thunderstorms moved north across southern Britain during the late morning and afternoon. Large hail (some stones of 2 cm diameter fell at Claygate) and squally winds accompanied some of them. The storms died out over Lincolnshire and the north Midlands in the early evening. There were also thundery showers over Ireland. An elderly couple had to be rescued from their home as storms and intense downpours caused flash flooding across south Wales. Cardiff and Cwmbran were worst hit with homes and businesses affected as well as the M4. South Wales Fire and Rescue Service said they received 115 calls with incidents also in Penarth in the Vale of Glamorgan and Bettws in Newport. (Kew Gardens 19.7C, Aviemore 8.1C maximum, Carterhouse 2.3C minimum, Cranwell 36.4 mm, Tiree 7.9 h.)

Low pressure over S Britain (centre 999 mb over Somerset at 1200 GMT) dominated weather conditions on the 23rd. Rainfall was widespread over most of England and Wales during the night and day, although the extreme SE corner remained largely dry. Rainfall also persisted across N and NE Scotland, with other falls across E Ireland at times. Elsewhere, skies were mainly cloudy although parts of SW Scotland had some sunny spells. Thundery showers broke out late in the day over Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. A section of the A55 in north Wales was closed due to flooding leading to tailbacks. (Weybourne 19.1C, Carterhouse 7.1C maximum, Drumalbin 2.7C minimum, Pennerley 27.2 mm, Tiree 11.9 h.)

Pressure remained low over S Britain on the 24th with associated fronts giving spells of rain in many areas. Overnight much of Scotland remained dry while in parts of S England there were some heavy falls. There were some thundery outbreaks over England during the day: the most notable affected Norfolk and east Lincolnshire post-dawn to mid-morning, south and east Kent in mid-afternoon, Warwickshire and the West Midlands in the late afternoon and early evening, and West Yorkshire in the early evening. Rainfall was generally heavier and more widespread across England and Wales during the day than overnight; S and E Ireland also had some falls while across Scotland the days was a largely dry one - although cloudy, except in parts of SW Scotland. (Weybourne 18.2C, Carterhouse 9.9C maximum, Achnagart 2.8C minimum, Hurn 27.2 mm, Tiree 14.0 h.)

The low centre moved over to Ireland on the 25th (1016 mb at 2400 GMT over the SW of Northern Ireland). Outbreaks of rain were mostly light but widespread overnight; during the day they became more widespread and extensive across Scotland, N England and areas bordering the Irish Sea. E areas of England were sunny with rather cloudy skies elsewhere. Thunder affected parts of northeast England and southern Scotland in the morning, and parts of northwest England and southern Scotland, and eastern Ireland, in the afternoon. (Weybourne 19.5C, Kinbrace 9.2C maximum, Mona 4.3C minimum, Edinburgh Gogarbank 36.2 mm, Heathrow 13.0 h.)

Patchy cloud into the 26th led to a slight ground in parts of E and Cent England before dawn. Areas close to the Irish Sea, and Scotland, had outbreaks of rain overnight - amounts were light and by dawn there was mist and a few fog patches in parts of NE Ireland and S and E Scotland. There were thundery showers over parts of eastern and northern Scotland and the east and north of Ireland, especially around the middle of the day; rainfall was generally heaviest and most widespread across Scotland Ireland during the day although a trough also gave some falls (heavy in places) in parts of E England. This latter area of rain moved into Wales in the evening. Most places, apart from NE Scotland and much of S England, had sunny spells during the day. (Charsfield 199.9C, Fair Isle 10.1C maximum, South Newington 2.1C minimum, Shoreham 20.2 mm, Boulmer 12.0 h.)

A surface flow from the E continued to affect the British Isles on the 27th. Areas Se of a line from Bristol to The Wash had the heaviest rainfall overnight - other falls occurred at times across N England and in a few places elsewhere. By dawn parts of Scotland and N Ireland were quite misty with some thick fog patches. During the day thundery showers affected parts of western and northern Scotland while the most general area of rain affected East Anglia and parts of NE England and the East Midlands - with some falls further W across England. Some of this rain was quite heavy in places. Reports spoke of nearly a month's rainfall in one day leading to localised flooding, causing problems for homes, businesses and roads across Norwich. The fire service was called to more than 25 incidents and two nightclubs had to be pumped free of water. Anglian Water said it had drafted in extra staff and some drainage systems had been "overwhelmed" by the deluge. Ireland and Scotland remained largely dry during the day with the best of the sunshine being across Ireland and in Cornwall. (Achnagart 20.8C, Fair Isle 10.8C maximum, Aviemore 2.4C minimum, Wattisham 48.8 mm, Bude 14.2 h.)

Parts of SE England had their third consecutive sunless day on the 28th due to a shallow area of low pressure over SE England. Much of England, apart from the SW and parts of the NW, had falls of rain overnight, heavy in places. This rain moved slowly N'wards into Cent Scotland by early evening with the S coast of England remaining largely dry during the day. Ireland and other parts of Scotland remained largely dry - although E Scotland, along with most of England, had a sunless day. After a cool start, it was a warm day across Ireland. (Shannon Airport 22.3, Scarborough 10.5C maximum, Katesbridge 3.7C minimum, Bridlington 24.2 mm, Cork Airport 13.2 h.)

A shallow area of low pressure remained centred close to S England on the 29th. Overnight it was mild, cloudy and misty across much of England with rain over S Scotland and some light falls in Wales and E Ireland later. Although the rain and drizzle tended to lessen during the day it remained rather misty across S and Cent parts of England. Parts of S and SE England had a little sunshine during the day - elsewhere England, Wales, E Ireland and much of S Scotland remained sunless. Thunder broke out amongst showers in parts of the southwest, chiefly Somerset, in the afternoon. (Kew Gardens 20.3C, Fylingdales 9.8C maximum, Fyvie Castle 6.0C minimum, Pershore College 15.0 mm, Kirkwall 11.4 h.)

During the 30th high pressure spread from the N across the British Isles, being centred at 1027 mb over S Scotland by 2400 GMT. This brought a ground frost to parts of Scotland before dawn - while England, Wales and parts of Ireland had mist and light rain or drizzle overnight - although this precipitation did steadily move away towards the S. The day was generally dry everywhere - except for some isolated outbreaks of rain in parts of SW England and S Wales - and it turned misty in the evening across much of England and wales and in parts of S Ireland. It was again a dull or sunless day across most of England. (Aviemore 20.1C, Fair Isle 9.0C maximum, Braemar -1.8C minimum, Usk No.2 6.8 mm, Kinloss 14.0 h.)

High pressure meant a mostly dry day on the 31st. Widespread mist and haze that formed over England, Wales and Ireland overnight soon cleared after dawn. Across Scotland it was a cool night in places with a ground frost in parts of S Scotland. Away from the Midlands and some adjacent counties the day was one with sunny spells with the highest temperatures being found over parts of Cent Scotland and N Ireland. (Helens Bay 22.8C, Lerwick 11.5C maximum, Redesdale Camp 1.7C minimum, Okehampton 0.4 mm, Morecambe 14.4 h.)

British Isles weather, June 2014

An E'ward moving frontal system gave some rain overnight into the 1st in parts of W Ireland and W Scotland while many other parts of Britain had a misty start to the month. The mist (and some fog patches) soon cleared and by midday the rain had reached parts of E Ireland and Cent Scotland. After a bright start it turned cloudy over England and Wales and by midnight light rain or drizzle had fallen as far E as E Scotland and the West Midlands. With further fronts following during the day it was rather dull generally in W parts of Ireland and Scotland. (Dishforth 22.4C, Fair Isle 11.9C maximum, Aboyne 3.6C minimum, Stornoway 5.6 mm, St Helier 13.2 h.)

Frontal precipitation affected most places at times during the 2nd as weak fronts spread from the W, giving mainly light to moderate falls in most places. Overnight minimum temperatures were mainly in the range 10-13C across the British Isles and the best of any sunshine was to be found in E areas. (St James Park 21.9C, Fair Isle 11.6C maximum, Charsfield 7.3C minimum, Keele 20.4 mm, Herstmonceux 4.5 h.)

Pressure remained low during the 3rd, with a shallow centre (1007 mb) over the SW Midlands at 2400 GMT. Light to moderate rain affected many places overnight with further widespread falls during the day - although the bulk of the rain affected Scotland and Ireland. Thundery showers affected parts of Ireland during the afternoon and early evening, and there may have been isolated thunder amongst the showers over northern and eastern Britain. Much of England and Wales had a rather cloudy day - the best of the sunshine was to be found in W Scotland and N areas of Ireland. (Wisley 20.8C, Fair Isle 10.1C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 6.3C minimum, Bridlington 13.2 mm, Valley 9.9 h.)

A slow-moving low centred remained over England during the 4th with a rather cloudy day ensuing as a result - except in W areas of Scotland and Ireland where there were long sunny periods. Parts of Cent and E Scotland had a slight ground frost before dawn, with some mist and fog patches in NE Scotland generally. Parts of NE Ireland, SW Scotland, SW England and S Wales had some heavy rainfall overnight and during the day these heavy falls moved E to affect many parts of Scotland, Wales and England. Just ahead of a cold pool, and following a spell of sunshine, a lively thundery shower developed over south Hampshire shortly before 1700 GMT and moved northeast, dying out over northwest Surrey shortly before 1900 GMT. Heavy rain and squally winds accompanied it. (Strathallan 16.9C, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 8.9C maximum, Braemar 1.4C minimum, Astwood Bank 35.8 mm, Stornoway 13.8 h.)

Low pressure continued to affect the British Isles on the 5th. However, widespread rain over Britain overnight gradually became largely confined to Scotland and a few parts of E England (where it lingered during the morning) by dawn - and by midnight had almost completely cleared from Scotland. Mist formed in the evening across parts of N Scotland and mainland Scotland had a rather cloudy day due to the rain area. Wales and S parts of England and Ireland had the best of the sunshine with long sunny spells during the day. (Manston 20.3C, Ballypatrick Forest 11.6C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule 3.9C minimum, Kinloss 28.0 mm, Cork Airport 13.9 h.)

The surface flow on the 6th became S'ly to SE'ly during the day as a large depression SW of Ireland began to exert an influence over the British Isles. Overnight cloud cover was quite varied with a touch of ground frost forming under clear skies in parts of Wales, N Ireland and SW Scotland - while light frontal rain due to the low pressure area was falling over S Ireland and Cornwall by dawn. Sherkin Island and Cork Airport reported 13 mm of rain in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT. During the day the rain was mainly confined to Ireland (19 mm fell in the 12 hours ending 1800 GMT at Cork Airport) while it was a warm day on Jersey and a sunny day in much of E and Cent England. Parts of N Scotland also had some light rain and drizzle that helped for and mist form here shortly before midnight. There may have been isolated thunder in showers during the afternoon and early evening in parts of Ireland and Wales, while a narrow band of thunderstorms moved N'wards over Cornwall in mid-evening. (St Helier 25.6C, Fair Isle 12.8C maximum, Bala 1.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 3.0 mm, Wattisham 14.0 h.)

Fronts moved NE'wards to affect most areas at times during the 7th. The day followed a mild night in S England where overnight minima did not fall below 15C in places. Rainfall overnight was mainly confined to Ireland, Wales and SW England - before becoming more widespread during the day, giving some heavy falls over S Scotland. Ahead of the rain the best of the sunshine was to be found in parts of N Scotland, once some early mist and fog had cleared from here during the morning. Two or three bands of rain, heavy and thundery in places, moved north over England and Wales overnight and during the morning. The thunder mainly affected the southwest during the early hours, north Wales and the west and north of the Midlands around daybreak, central southern England towards mid-morning, and East Anglia and Lincolnshire in the late morning. Much of the south and east of the Midlands, and much of northern England, did not have any thunder - and even where it did occur, storms were mostly short-lived with only pockets of notable activity and/or very heavy rain. During the afternoon and evening, thundery showers moved north over the west and north of Ireland, and there were also some over southwest England and the western Midlands. (Manston 24.1C, Fair Isle 13.5C maximum, Braemar 5.6C minimum, West Freugh 22.8 mm, Stornoway 10.1 h.)

A rather cloudy S'ly flow persisted during the 8th. Rain fell across N and E Scotland overnight with some light falls also occurring in parts of Wales, E Ireland and SW England. Further light rain and showers fell in places during the day, although E England was generally dry and had some of the sunniest places. Thundery showers affected various parts of the country during the afternoon and early evening, being most prominent over Cent, W and N Ireland, N and E Scotland, the north Midlands, Lancashire and NE England and around the Bristol Channel. The storms moved fairly swiftly NNE'wards. (Gravesend 25.4C, Fair Isle 15.1C maximum, Redesdale Camp 5.7C minimum, Derrylin Cornahoule 19.2 mm, Charlwood 12.6 h.)

Weak fronts in a S'ly flow gave some cloud or rain to all areas at times on the 9th. Some mist and fog patches affected N England overnight. There was isolated thunder overnight, especially in the extreme southeast. A thundery outbreak moved north over the west and north of the Midlands during the morning, and grew into a lengthy spell of rain that crossed much of northern England and Scotland during the afternoon, with thunder mainly at its southern boundary (especially in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire, where there were severe thunderstorms). Western and northern Ireland also had thundery showers, and further outbreaks of rain with isolated thunder moved northeast across England and Wales in the evening. Some mist and fog patches returned to N England in the evening. (Writtle 26.5C, Fair Isle 14.7C maximum, Eskdalemuir 5.7C minimum, Gringley On The Hill 22.2 mm, Lerwick 12.6 h.)

A S'ly flow continued during the 10th - with rather cloudy skies away from the E half of England. Rain and showers were widespread overnight - and again during the day, except in the E half of England. There were a lot of showers and thunderstorms in the west and north, linked to an upper trough and set off mostly away from windward coasts by convergence zones and high ground; some places had two or three storms, although the swift movement of them generally meant relatively low rainfall totals. Hail fell in places. The areas particularly affected by the storms were most of Ireland, away from the southern and northwestern coastal fringes, eastern and northern Scotland, a long zone from northwest Devon across southern, central and east Wales and the west and north Midlands to north Lincolnshire, and from northeast Wales across the centre of northern England. N England had some early mist and fog patches that cleared shortly after dawn. (Santon Downham 24.1C, Fair Isle 13.3C maximum, Braemar 7.2C minimum, Preston Moor Park 29.4 mm, Charlwood 14.3 h.)

High pressure developed across the British Isles during the 11th, being centred at 1030 mb over the Bristol Channel by 2400 GMT. Overnight, rain was largely confined to N Scotland and to a few places from Wales to N England - with just a little rain across parts of Scotland during the day. There were thundery showers briefly around the middle of the day in NE Grampian region. There were sunny periods in all areas once the rain had cleared - with some mist and fog patches, especially in Wales. (Bridlington 22.5C, St Bees Head 13.6C maximum, Katesbridge 2.9C minimum, Shap 8.0 mm, Aberporth 12.8 h.)

High pressure remained centred over SW areas on the 12th - with only a little rainfall (over N and Cent Scotland later in the day) as a result. Daytime temperatures reached 25C in the London area as much of England and Wales had prolonged sunshine. (St James Park 26.1C, Baltasound 12.3C maximum, Bala 4.8C minimum, Dunstaffnage 3.0 mm, St Athan 15.1 h.)

During the 13th weakening fronts moved E'wards across most areas. W Ireland and N Scotland had some moderately heavy rainfall overnight and this spread further S in Scotland during the day. In the later afternoon and evening rain and drizzle also fell across parts of Wales and in Cent and N England. It was a very sunny day in much of S England but generally dull across Scotland. A cold pool drifted eastwards from Ireland then SE'wards across England during the afternoon and night. There were brief isolated thundery showers over central Ireland in mid-afternoon, and in mid-Wales and around Goole in mid-evening. From 1900 GMT to 0100 GMT/14th, a major thunderstorm outbreak affected the counties of Gloucester, Wiltshire, Oxford, Hampshire and Berkshire, and southwest Surrey and parts of West Sussex. The towns of Swindon, Oxford, Reading and Guildford were amongst those hit by very heavy rain and frequent thunder and lightning. It began in the Gloucester area around 2000 GMT and slowly mushroomed out from there on a broadly easterly, later southeasterly, track. There were a few brief offerings over parts of Hampshire in mid-evening before the main storm arrived. Movement was slow, the storm lasting for a couple of hours in many places. It reached Swindon around 2100 GMT, Reading around 2300 GMT and Guildford by 2400 GMT. (Heathrow 26.1C, Lerwick 12.6C maximum, Trawsgoed 6.1C minimum, Aviemore 18.6 mm, Bude 15.4 h.)

In S England early thundery activity declined notably after 0100h on the 14th, though there were still isolated discharges over south Surrey and West Sussex until about 0300 GMT. Over 25 mm of rain fell in places, especially in the Reading area, in 3-4 hours before the storms finally ended. Pressure remained high during the day although with some frontal rain in parts of NE England and E Scotland overnight. Some showery outbreaks affected mainly the E half of Scotland and England at times during the day and across N and Cent Scotland it was, again, a rather dull day. (Hurn 24.9C, Lerwick 12.0C maximum, Shap 7.0C minimum, Reading University 30.2 mm, Bude 14.6 h.)

High pressure remained centred to the W of Ireland during the 15th. Overnight rain fell mainly in Cent and E Scotland - and towards dawn in NE England. These outbreaks over N England mainly cleared during the day although a few showers affected a few other areas. The E half of England and Scotland remained largely overcast during the day - while some places in Ireland, W wales and SW Scotland managed almost unbroken sunshine. (Chivenor 23.2C, Fair Isle 12.3C maximum, Katesbridge 6.9C minimum, Strathallan 4.6 mm, Magilligan 14.7 h.)

The anticyclone, centre 1034-1036 mb, remained centred just W of Ireland during the 16th. Parts of Wales and NW England had some light rain overnight - while in Scotland clear skies almost led to a ground frost in some places, followed by temperatures during the day over 22C. Some patchy light rain and drizzle affected parts of East Anglia and E England during the day at times, while it was parts of N Ireland that were the sunniest overall with in excess of 15 h of bright sunshine in places. (Glasgow 24.7C, Fair Isle 12.8C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 4.0C minimum, Rhyl 1.8 mm, Thomastown 15.7 h.)

Although high pressure persisted on the 17th, frontal cloud remained close to E Scotland, giving a dull day here with some rainfall. Elsewhere, many places had long sunny spells during the day. Parts of W Scotland and Ireland had some early mist and fog patches in the light wind before minimum temperatures rose to 24C and above here in places. (Glasgow 26.1C, Fair Isle 12.7C maximum, Bala 5.6C minimum, Edinburgh Botanic Gardens 3.0 mm, Aberporth 15.3 h.)

Mist and fog patches formed before dawn on the 18th across Ireland and Scotland although these soon cleared in early sunshine. Across Ireland it was a very sunny day, while in Scotland a S'wards moving cold front brought some cloud to N parts during the morning. Most places had a dry day. However, a thunderstorm developed in the Arbroath area in the late afternoon, then moved out to sea. There was another one briefly NW of Newcastle around 1800 GMT. They were set off by high temperatures that reached 25C in places in E Scotland. (Strathallan 26.5C, Fair Isle 12.2C maximum, Braemar 6.9C minimum, Bala 1.4 mm, Dublin Airport and Casement Aerodrome 15.6 h.)

An anticyclonic N'ly flow persisted in most areas on the 19th while a weakening cold front pushed S'wards across England. The front gave little precipitation as it passed - although cloudy skies meant only 3-4 h of bright sunshine in many places in England close to the North Sea. NW Scotland was rather cloudy and in most places sunshine occurrence was confined to that of sunny intervals. (Hurn 25.7C, Fair Isle 11.9C maximum, Santon Downham 3.8C minimum, Shoeburyness 0.8 mm, Glasgow 15.5 h.)

MSL pressure fell slightly during the 20th, although by 2400 GMT was still in the range 1025 mb (W Ireland) to 1015 mb (Shetland). The result was just a little rain across N Scotland due to a nearby front and mainly dry weather elsewhere. Places close to the North Sea and in W Ireland had cloud cover that held down the sunshine duration - while inland areas had over 12 h of sunshine in places. (Usk No.2 23.8C, Fair Isle 11.9C maximum, Katesbridge 3.2C minimum, Resallach 2.6 mm, Ronaldsway 15.1 h.)

The frontal conditions off NE Scotland pulled further S during the 21st leading to further rain and drizzle over N Scotland overnight, and somewhat lighter falls here during the day. Elsewhere the day was a dry, anticyclonic one with long spells of sunshine away from the coasts in S Ireland, Wales and Cent and S England. (Gravesend 24.4C, Fair Isle 12.3C maximum, Sennybridge 3.8C minimum, Baltasound 6.6 mm, Ronaldsway and Valley 15.4 h.)

There was further light rain overnight into the 22nd in N and NE Scotland and this became more widespread in these areas during the day. Otherwise, the day was a largely dry one with most places having long sunny spells in S and Cent England, Wales and E Ireland. In the London area temperatures reached 25C in a few spots. (Wisley 25.6C, Fair Isle 12.0C maximum, Swyddffynnon 3.5C minimum, Craibstone 9.4 mm, Manston 14.9 h.)

Pressure remained highest to the W on the 23rd with frontal cloud again causing problems over E districts. N and NE Scotland had rain and drizzle overnight and during the day. Parts of W Scotland also had a few showers during the day. As a weak upper trough drifted southeast over England, there were thundery showers in the afternoon over south Lincolnshire and places S towards Bedfordshire with some showers also falling in parts of S England. Temperatures reached 25C in parts of the S with most places (except Scotland) having sunny spells during the day. (Charlwood 26.2C, Lerwick 11.4C maximum, Swyddffynnon 6.2C minimum, Santon Downham 11.0 mm, Valley 15.1 h.)

Rain fell across N and Cent parts of Scotland overnight into the 24th associated with a S'ward-moving cold front. As this moved S'wards there was further rain, mainly slight, as far S as Kent by late evening. Sunny spells occurred ahead of, and behind, the front and there was thunder in parts of NE Norfolk in the early afternoon. (Lee-on-Solent 25.9C, Fair Isle 11.9C maximum, Wick Airport 5.4C minimum, Marham 7.6 mm, Bude 14.9 h.)

An area of low pressure to the W of Ireland pushed frontal systems across Ireland during the 25th. SW Scotland and N Ireland had some moderately heavy overnight rainfall and it remained rather damp across Ireland during the day. Rainfall also affected SW Scotland in particular during the day although ahead of the rain parts of NW Scotland say some sunny spells. However, the best of the sunshine was to be found in S England and the Channel Islands. (Whitechurch 22.6C, Fair Isle 11.6C maximum, Altnaharra 2.2C minimum, Stormont Castle 17.6 mm, Camborne 13.9 h.)

By 2400 GMT on the 26th a complex area of low pressure was located close to SW Ireland and the analysis charts showed several fronts that affected much of the S half of the British Isles during the day. Rainfall was especially heavy and prolonged at times over SE Ireland and Cornwall during the day - with most of Ireland having a rather dull day. Across Scotland it was mainly dry with sunny intervals. (Northolt 22.6C, Lerwick 11.6C maximum, Altnaharra 0.9C minimum, Camborne 21.6 mm, Stornoway 16.4 h.)

The 27th was an unsettled day with rainfall overnight affecting most of Ireland, Wales, and S and Cent parts of England. The same area saw the bulk of the rain during the day; from late morning to around dusk, there was a lot of thundery activity over much of southwest England, Wales, the Midlands and northern parts of East Anglia, as surface and upper lows extended across these areas. Over Scotland the day was much drier; there was some rainfall in places although away from the W it was a rather dull day in many counties. (Writtle 23.9C, Dalwhinnie 10.7C maximum, Carterhouse 2.9C minimum, Market Bosworth 28.2 mm, Prestwick 11.6 h.)

The 28th brought a mostly N'ly flow behind a S'ward-moving cold front as it passed over S Ireland, wales and England. Both overnight and during the day there were scattered falls of rain across the British Isles but during the day the front gave the heaviest falls over parts of S England. There were heavy showers from mid-morning to near dusk over southern Britain; some were accompanied by thunder, especially during the late morning and early afternoon in a broad convergence zone from the southwest peninsula across Somerset, Wiltshire and Berkshire to Surrey, and also from Worcester to Norwich. A funnel cloud was seen from Shoreham at about 1800 GMT. A large area of N and Cent England had a rather dull day. (Frittenden 20.9C, Emley Moor 11.2C maximum, Tyndrum 3.4C minimum, Okehampton 31.8 mm, Aberporth 12.9 h.)

A weak flow from the N to NW persisted on the 29th with outbreaks of light rainfall in many places at times - especially in the E half of England and Scotland. There was an early ground frost under clear skies in parts of Cent Scotland, while most places had sunny spells during the day in between the spells of rain and showers. (Thorney Island 22.1C, Fair Isle 12.4C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 2.0C minimum, Hull East Park 18.2 mm, Tiree 15.5 h.)

During the 30th the surface flow became more SE'ly due to an area of low pressure to the SW of the British Isles. Overnight the showers in the E tended to die out although a little light rain affected parts of Scotland both overnight and during the day. A convergence zone edged slowly northeast across southeast England, bringing slow-moving and occasionally heavy showers from late morning to early evening. There was a solitary electrical discharge in northwest Surrey in the late afternoon. (Castlederg 22.7C, Fair Isle 12.6C maximum, Capel Curig 2.0C minimum, Wisley 27.0 mm, Magilligan 15.4 h.)

British Isles weather, July 2014

Winds were generally light on the 1st under a weak ridge of high pressure - and most places remained dry as a result. However, in parts of SW England there were some light showers and falls of rain due to a low pressure system to the SW of the British Isles and some showers also fell in parts of the Midlands and Scotland. Parts of Scotland had some early fog patches while there were hazy conditions around dawn in parts of the S Midlands and S England. Across Ireland and SW Scotland sunshine totals were generally in the range 12-15 h. (Porthmadog 24.2C, Fair Isle 14.1C maximum, Katesbridge 0.8C minimum, Sutton Bonington 5.2 mm, Tiree 15.4 h.)

A weak ridge gave way to advancing fronts from the NW during the 2nd. During a dry night some mist and haze developed across Cent, E and S England in particular by dawn. By midday increasing cloud had brought some rain to many parts of Scotland - with falls of rain and drizzle then following across many parts of Ireland, W Wales and in parts of N England. Across S England it was a largely sunny day but the cloud cover was rather persistent in N Ireland and in some Cent and S areas of Scotland. (Writtle 25.2C, Fair Isle 14.6C maximum, Santon Downham 3.5C minimum, Achnagart 11.4 mm, St Helier 14.7 h.)

Although there was further activity in the W of the British Isles on the 3rd, the advancing cold front did not quite reach SE England which, along with East Anglia, had a warm day away from the coasts with long spells of sunshine. W Scotland and Ireland had a rather cloudy day with spells of light rain and drizzle, and there were also light falls of rain in N England and Wales. (Writtle 27.7C, Fair Isle 14.1C maximum, Aboyne 6.4C minimum, Harris Quidnish 5.4 mm, Hurn 15.1 h.)

Frontal cloud made for a mild start to the 4th with overnight minimum temperatures above 15C in many places from Fife S'wards. Early rin across W parts of Scotland and Ireland moved SE'wards to become widespread over Ireland, Scotland and much of Wales and W England by midday. By late evening the rain had cleared across much of Ireland and Scotland - and light rain and drizzle was falling across most of England and Wales, after another very warm day in East Anglia and SE England. (Weybourne 28.7C maximum, Lerwick 13.4C maximum, Cavendish 8.6C minimum, Shap 34.0 mm, Wattisham 13.3 h.)

Overnight frontal rain had largely moved away E from England by midday on the 5th, introducing slightly cooler air from the NW. These cool conditions had been enough to give a ground frost in parts of N Scotland while overnight minimum temperatures in E and S England had been about 15-16C in places. During the day there were showery outbreaks across Ireland and Scotland (some accompanied by thunder) - with some light rain and showers in parts of SE England. Over 20 mm of rain fell in parts of the Channel Islands - where it was a dull day. (Writtle 23.1C, Fair Isle 11.6C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 2.0C minimum, Durham 19.2 mm, Tiree 12.9 h.)

Showers and falls of rain occurred at times across many parts of the British Isles on the 6th with falls being generally heaviest and most widespread in W parts of Scotland and Ireland. There was thundery rain over parts of North Yorkshire (especially the Whitby area) mid-morning, and thunder in several of the showers over eastern Ireland around the middle of the day and further east during the afternoon and early evening. Eastern Scotland, northeast England, parts of the Midlands, and Dorset were most affected. Away from the North Sea coasts of England and mainland Scotland, where it was rather cloudy at times, there were spells of sunshine throughout the day. (Writtle 22.3C, Fair Isle 13.4C maximum, Braemar 1.2C minimum, Scarborough 22.0 mm, Aberporth 14.5 h.)

Overnight into the 7th rain affected Scotland and W Ireland in particular, with other more scatted falls mostly in W parts of England and Wales. During the day these outbreaks spread further E with heavy falls in places at times (notably in parts of Cornwall and Devon). Thunderstorms occurred with some of the rain. (Writtle 23.9C maximum, Fair Isle 14.7C maximum, Kinbrace 1.9C minimum, Exeter Airport 17.2 mm, Valley 11.3 h.)

During the 8th the surface flow gradually turned N'ly and, after a wet night in N Ireland and SW Scotland, rainfall became widespread during the day - although mainly of a showery nature. As pressure rose in the W it turned drier here during the day. Thunder was widespread across England and parts of Wales in the afternoon. A waterspout appeared off the coast at Llangennith, Gower. It could be seen pulling up water from the surface of the sea before moving in land just before 1200 GMT. The waterspout formed as unstable air brought heavy showers and thunderstorms to South Wales. Flash flooding has stranded drivers and closed a number of streets in the West Midlands. The fire service said it responded to reports of flooding in Streetly and Aldridge, near Walsall. Severn Trent Water said it had received reports of flooding across the West Midlands region. By midnight rainfall had largely ceased, although it was misty in many parts of E England and E Scotland. (Santon Downham 22.2C, Fair Isle 13.8C maximum, Braemar 4.0C minimum, Chillingham Barns 44.8 mm, Stornoway 14.9 h.)

During the 9th fronts gave spells of rain over Shetland during the morning and early afternoon, and also falls of rain and drizzle across W Ireland during the afternoon and evening. Elsewhere there were long spells of sunshine although the N'ly flow kept it cool on coasts adjacent to the North Sea. (Carlisle 23.9C, Baltasound 12.7C maximum, Altnaharra 3.8C minimum, Baltasound 11.0 mm, Glasgow 16.1 h.)

Frontal cloud continued to affect areas in the W and E of the British Isles on the 10th. Overnight the drizzle and rain was mainly confined to W Ireland - later spreading E'wards as far as Wales during the day. East Anglia and parts of SE England had falls of rain during the day. As a result areas of E England and W Ireland also had a rather dull day - although in many areas from Jersey to NW Scotland there was prolonged sunshine. There was a thundery outbreak over NE Norfolk in the late afternoon. (Lee-on-Solent 26.7C, Fylingdales 12.3C maximum, Braemar 2.1C minimum, Wainfleet 26.2 mm, Leuchars 16.0 h.)

Fronts remained over, or close to, the western and eastern margins of the British Isles on the 11th. Overnight light rain and drizzle affected parts of E England. Mist was quite widespread by dawn in many places with some fog in Scotland. Visibility soon improved in most places but rain and drizzle continued to fall in East Anglia and SE England during the morning. In the afternoon and evening rain and drizzle fell across W Ireland and later parts of W Scotland, while E and cent England turned misty with some fog patches in the evening. It was a warm day in parts of E Scotland. Away from Ireland, Shetland and the rain areas, most places had 8-12 h of bright sunshine. (Usk No.2 26.0C, Fair Isle 14.7C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 2.3C minimum, Cavendish 19.6 mm, Morecambe 15.0 h.)

Overnight into the 12th there widespread mist and some fog patches across E, S and Cent parts of England and Wales. Light rain fell across Ireland and W Scotland, and in parts of East Anglia with a thunderstorm over southeast Suffolk. The rain and drizzle in the W slowly moved E to all areas during the day and evening - the rain turned heavy and showery in places with thunderstorms in various districts, especially the west of East Anglia, late in the day. The heaviest falls tended to be in W parts of Scotland and Ireland with E England (away from the coasts) having a very warm day. In the W half of the British Isles there was little sunshine at all. (Heathrow 27.7C, Fair Isle 14.1C maximum, Shap 7.0C maximum, Port Ellen 18.2 mm, Hurn 9.3 h.)

The 13th dawned after a widespread warm night across the British Isles, with overnight minimum temperatures ranging from 14C in parts of N Scotland to 17C in places in Cent S and SE England. Overnight rainfall and drizzle was widespread - although totals in Ireland were generally small. During the day this frontal rain continued to clear away E'wards from E Britain but some warm conditions here triggered one or two heavy showers and these were occasionally thundery in East Anglia and Kent later. In most places it was a rather cloudy day while the frontal cloud cleared. (St James Park 25.5C, Fair Isle 13.7C maximum, Katesbridge 8.5C minimum, Wattisham 66.8 mm, Morecambe 12.5 h.)

A developing low centre moved from W of Ireland towards Shetland during the 14th, bringing spells of rain across Ireland and Scotland in particular. Falls of rain also affected parts of Wales and N England - later moving into SW England and the Midlands. Places E of a line Hull-Dorset had a sunny day with cloud arriving from the W later with the extreme SE not turning cloudy in the evening. (Heathrow 25.2C, Dalwhinnie 14.8C maximum, Eskdalemuir 3.9C minimum, Capel Curig 15.8 mm, St Helier 12.8 h.)

Ahead of a cold front that cleared the SE in the morning, the 15th had overnight minimum temperatures of 16-18C in parts of East Anglia and SE England. Early rain also fell for a while during the early morning across parts of Wales and Scotland - but during the day it was generally dry until another area of frontal rain spread across much of Ireland and into W Scotland and Cornwall in the evening. Most places had a day with sunny spells and varying amounts of cloud cover. (Heathrow 26.5C, Lerwick 14.7C maximum, Katesbridge 6.4C minimum, Resallach 5.4 mm, Ronaldsway and Valley 13.3 h.)

Overnight minimum temperatures of about 16C occurred in parts of SW Wales and Cornwall overnight into the 16th due to a warm sector that gave some rain here and in much of Ireland and W Scotland. During the day much of W Britain saw spells of rain - mostly like in England and Wales - as did Scotland and Ireland. In E Scotland daytime temperatures rose to 22C in places before a cold front moved E'wards and gave light rain to much of England and Wales by midnight. Showers gave some thunder to much of E Scotland later and temperatures widely rose to 26C in East Anglia and SE England. (Writtle 27.9C, Fair Isle 13.5C maximum, Redesdale Camp 5.1C minimum, Eskdalemuir 15.4 mm, Manston 12.8 h.)

Away from N and W coasts of Ireland and Scotland the 17th was generally warm as an area of high pressure (centre 1024 mb off E Lincolnshire at 1200 GMT) crossed the British Isles. Across S England many places reported maximum temperatures of 27C following overnight minima of 16C. It was misty with some fog patches in the Midlands and parts of Wales by dawn while in the evening a trough brought an area of showers with some thundery rain to S Ireland and the SW of England and Wales. Many parts of England and Wales had long sunny spells during the day. (Hampton Water Works 29.5C, Fair Isle 14.5C maximum, Katesbridge 6.3C minimum, Resallach 4.2 mm, Leconfield 14.4 h.)

The 18th gave a SE'ly flow to most parts of the British Isles, drawing very warm air across much of England. Overnight minimum temperatures remained as high as 18-20C as far N as mid-Wales with much of S and Cent Ireland and S and Cent England and Wales having some overnight rainfall that was heavy and thundery in places. Some of these storms were severe; a house in Gloucester was badly damaged after it was struck by lightning. A television aerial was hit by the bolt which scattered roof tiles and masonry, a Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service spokesman said. The brigade attended more than 20 weather-related incidents overnight but no-one was reported injured. These thundery conditions moved N'wards during the day into S Scotland by mid-afternoon before more thunderstorms moved into SE England and the Midlands during the evening. Residual thundery rain became very patchy as it moved north across central regions during the day, and the northern half of Scotland was bright or sunny. It was mostly very warm or hot. Daytime temperatures reach 30C in places as far N as Norfolk and the East Midlands in the E half of England. (Gravesend 32.3C, Fair Isle 14.6C maximum, Aboyne 5.7C minimum, Writtle 15.0 mm, Stornoway 14.2 h.)

Several fronts and widespread cloud meant a rather cloudy day across the British Isles on the 19th. Overnight it was warm with few places in England having minimum temperatures below 15C (19.6C at Heathrow) while in East Anglia and SE England maxima reached 28C in many places. Rain and showers heavy and thundery in places, moved north across much of the UK during the day into N Scotland. Heavy, locally thundery, showers gave large hail in parts of the SE Midlands. Further outbreaks of thunderstorms moved N across E Kent and the east of East Anglia during the evening. Flood measures were overwhelmed in St Peter Port when a sudden downpour of hail and heavy rain struck Guernsey at about 1045 GMT, police said; flooding also occurred at the Longstore, the Rue de Coutanchez, and the Rohais in St Peter Port. A heat-health watch was put in place in parts of southern and eastern England for the day. Heathrow Airport said 17 flights had been cancelled because of the stormy weather. The roof of a house in Chelmsford collapsed after being struck by lightning overnight. Lightning struck houses in the market village of Lenham, near Maidstone, and caused several small fires in Willesborough, near Ashford. Twenty-seven patients on the cardiology ward at the Royal United Hospital in Bath had to be moved to other parts of the hospital after heavy rain brought down part of a ceiling. A football match between Nuneaton Town and Coventry City was abandoned after the pitch was "pelted with torrential rain, thunder, lightning and gale-force winds". (St James Park 28.5C, Wick Airport 14.8C maximum, Lentran 11.1C minimum, Westonbirt 78.8 mm, Wattisham 6.2 h.)

The 20th followed another warm night with overnight minimum temperatures remaining above 13C in most areas, and above 17C in parts of E England. Thundery rain affected parts of E England and the Northern Isles in the early hours with some rain in other parts of Scotland and E Ireland; this was followed by widespread mist and some fog by dawn across England. During the day NE Scotland had some rain for a while; after a sunny and warm day more showers and thunderstorms developed elsewhere, especially over Lincolnshire, the E Midlands, East Anglia and SE England. Parts of Norwich saw a month's worth of rain falling in a hour on Sunday causing flash flooding in some parts of the city. Norwich Airport recorded 46 mm of rain during 1400-1500 GMT. An unofficial reading in the Carrow Road area of 57 mm in half an hour was reported in the local press. Several homes and businesses were flooded during an "enormous downpour" in the East Yorkshire town of Market Weighton in two hours in the evening. More than 200 homes were flooded on Canvey Island in Essex after 60 mm of rain reportedly fell. Kent fire service said the first floor and roof of a house in Sittingbourne had been set alight by a lightning strike and a bungalow's roof was hit in Whitstable. (Lee-on-Solent 27.3C, Harris Quidnish 15.6C maximum, Okehampton 9.9C minimum, Norwich Airport 58.0 mm, St Athan 13.2 h.)

High pressure developing down the spine of the UK led to drier conditions on the 21st. E and S parts of England had a warm night while overnight rain was mostly confined to NE Scotland - before some frontal rain began falling in W Ireland later. It remained damp in NE Scotland during the day while light rain fell at times across Ireland. Away from these places most locations had a sunny day with very warm conditions in SE and Cent S England. (Thorney Island and Lee-on-Solent 27.7C, Lerwick 16.2C maximum, Eskdalemuir 6.6C minimum, Fair Isle 8.4 mm, Morecambe 14.4 h.)

It was a very warm night into the 22nd across much of Ireland; overnight minimum temperatures in Finner, County Donegal and Castlederg, County Tyrone fell to 18.4C and 17C respectively. Except in W Ireland it was a mostly dry day and the temperature then reached 26.1C at the Giant's Causeway, making it the warmest day of the year in Northern Ireland so far. Mist, low cloud and some fog patches affected much of E Britain early in the day - this then cleared back to the coast largely during the morning; in the evening mist and fog patches again formed, initially in NE Scotland and later in many parts of E England. Much od Cent and E England and Scotland then had long sunny spells during the day. (Lee-on-Solent 29.9C, Fair Isle 15.7C maximum, Shap 7.0C minimum, Lough Fea 1.0 mm, Morecambe 15.6 h.)

Pressure was generally high on the 23rd being 1028 mb on Shetland by 0000 GMT. The day was warm everywhere except on the Northern Isles, reaching 25-26C in parts of N Scotland and 27-29C widely across S England, the Midlands and parts of East Anglia away from the coasts. Low cloud, mist and fog patches were widespread by dawn across much of England and Scotland - but this soon cleared away back to the North Sea coast, except on the Northern Isles where fog persisted all day in places. Along the North Sea coast mist and low cloud also persisted in places. Only in W Ireland (3 mm of rain at Belmullet in the 24 hours ending 1800 GMT) was there any meaningful rainfall. Away from these areas of rain and persistent fog or low cloud there were long, sunny spells during the day. (Heathrow 29.8C, Fair Isle 14.4C maximum, Carterhouse 7.8C minimum, Inverbervie 0.4 mm, Tiree 15.2 h.)

The 24th dawned after a warm night in S England and some light rain and drizzle in W Ireland. Across parts of Ireland and in Cent and E areas of Britain there was widespread mist and low cloud, with some fog patches. This soon cleared back towards east coasts - except on the Northern Isles where fog lingered all day in places. High pressure up to 1024 mb on Shetland at 2400 GMT) led to a mainly E'ly surface flow during the day. Most places remained dry away from W Ireland where it was rather cloudy with some thundery showers; thundery showers also affected parts of SW England giving a rather cloudy day here also. Most places had a nother hot day - temperatures reaching 30C in parts of S England and even 28C in parts of N Scotland. (Lee-on-Solent 30.6C, Fair Isle 16.4C maximum, Braemar 6.9C minimum, Bude 17.2 mm, Dyce and Tiree 14.6 h.)

Fro most of the British Isles the 25th was a dry day. E parts of Britain and w areas of Ireland had mist and fog around dawn - due partially to an E'ly wind. This generally soon cleared to give a warm and sunny day with temperatures reaching 27C as far N as N Scotland and as far W as Shannon Airport. However, during the afternoon and after a cloudier day, heavy thundery downpours affected SE England and places to the W, with showers also in parts of the Midlands. Lightning strikes and resulting signal failures led to a series of cancellations on the railways across S England. (Lee-on-Solent 29.2C, Fair Isle 15.2C maximum, Kinbrace 6.2C minimum, Morden 25 mm, Kinloss 15.2 h.)

A cold front that was producing light rain in W Ireland at 0000 GMT on the 26th moved slowly E'wards across Scotland, Ireland and into W parts of England by the end of the day. In S parts of England, Wales and Ireland overnight minimum temperatures were 16-17C in many places and by 0600 GMT 4mm of rain had fallen at Shannon Airport. Low cloud, mist and fog patches again affected E Britain by dawn; this soon cleared and by midday the rain in the W had extended across Ireland and into W Scotland. Much of Scotland had rainfall during the day but across E Scotland and in much of England and E wales temperatures reached 26-27C, and slightly higher in SE England and East Anglia. There was some thunder, especially late in the day over eastern Scotland. (Cavendish 29.9C, Fair Isle 16.1C maximum, Aboyne 6.8C minimum, Strathallan 14.6 mm, St Helier 12.8 h.)

Temperatures were lower on the 27th as low pressure brought extensive cloud at times to some areas of the British Isles. It was a warm night SE of a line Cardiff-The Wash with rainfall to the N of this line. During the day rainfall was largely confined to N Ireland and Scotland. Slow-moving heavy showers affected parts of East Sussex and Kent during the afternoon, drifting northeast to turn thundery briefly over Thanet in the early evening before clearing into the North Sea; 14 mm of rain fell at Herstmonceux in the 12 h ending 1800 GMT. (Thorney Island 26.3C, Altnahinch Filters 14.3C maximum, Katesbridge 5.3C minimum, Loch Glascarnoch 33 mm, Leconfield 12.8 h.)

The main area of rain overnight into the 28th was across N Ireland, Wales and SW Scotland. However, some heavy rain with thunder developed across They developed across parts of East Anglia in the early hours of the morning, with further areas of heavy showers across Sussex, Surrey, Kent and the south of London following later. The showers were very heavy in places with thunderstorms, hail, and torrential rain reported, giving high rainfall totals and localised flooding in some areas. According to the Met Office, heavy bursts of rain included falls at Great Dunmow (Essex, 43 mm, 0300-4000 GMT), Isfield (Sussex, 37 mm 0730-0830 GMT) and Ardingly (Sussex, 35 mm 0730-0830 GMT). Two women had to rescued from a car stranded in flash flooding in north-west London outside South Ruislip Station during heavy rain. The A40 Western Avenue in Uxbridge remained closed for much of the day because of flooding. There was also hail and flooding outside homes in Hove, Brighton and Worthing. Elsewhere during the day it was mostly dry except for some light rain in parts of Ireland. (Church Lawford 25.3C, Fair Isle 15.1C maximum, Braemar 5.5C minimum, Santon Downham 51.2 mm, Leconfield 13.0 h.)

Overnight rain onto the 29th fell across the SE corner of England before moving away E'wards. More widespread drizzle and rain affected Ireland parts of W Scotland before dawn; this was part of a frontal band that fragmented as it spread E'wards during the day - giving a few light falls in places. Away from East Anglia and SE and Cent S England sunshine amounts were generally small due to cloud associated with this front. (Thorney Island 27.5C, Cluanie Inn 15.1C maximum, Ravensworth 6.5C minimum, Shoeburyness 11.4 mm, Yeovilton 12.8 h.)

Fronts gave outbreaks of rain across Ireland and Scotland on the 30th although England and Wales remained generally dry. In S areas of Ireland, Wales and England there were long sunny spells; further N in England and Wales it was rather cloudy and dull - and there was little sunshine across Scotland and N parts of Ireland, although in E Scotland temperatures rose to 20-22C. (St James Park 26.5C, Resallach 13.4C maximum, Benson 8.3C minimum, Cluanie Inn 13.2 mm, St Athan 13.4 h.)

Frontal rain in the N moved S'wards on the 31st, fragmenting as it did so and giving some S areas of England (away from the SW) little more than a cloudy afternoon. However, parts of the Midlands and East Anglia had a spell of heavy, showery rain. Ahead of these showers many places S of a line Dorset-Suffolk had quite a sunny day. (Gravesend 26.2C, Loch Glascarnoch 13.3C maximum, South Newington 8.7C minimum, Drumnadrochit 31.8 mm, Herstmonceux 11.6 h.)

British Isles weather, August 2014

Fronts and areas of low pressure to the W led to generally unsettled conditions on the 1st. Rain and drizzle fell across Scotland, W Wales and Ireland overnight while, under clearer skies, a widespread mist with some fog patches formed across much of England by dawn. During the day the rain spread into England and Wales with some heavy falls in parts of Wales and SW England; it gradually cleared from Scotland later in the day with some mist and fog patches forming here in the evening. Temperatures reached 25C in parts of SE and E England. (Coningsby 26.1C, Lerwick 14.8C maximum, Baltasound 6.4C minimum, Trawscoed 26.6 mm, Manston 11.6 h.)

Low pressure remained centred close to, or over, the Irish Sea on the 2nd with the centre 994 mb over NE Ireland at 2400 GMT. Cloudy skies led to a mild night across much of England, Wales and Ireland (overnight minimum temperatures of 17C occurred on the Isle of Wight and on Jersey). Rain was widespread across Ireland, Wales and N England in particular overnight, with lesser falls elsewhere. Falls during the day were more widespread and also heavy in places, although it did turn drier over England and Wales into the evening. N Scotland was mostly dry as was the extreme SW and E of the British Isles. Thunderstorms were reported in places across S and E England in the afternoon. (Weybourne 25.8C, Banagher Caugh Hill 12.6C maximum, Altnaharra 3.7C minimum, Ballypatrick Forest 50.4 mm, Camborne 11.3 h.)

The low centred moved N'wards off W Scotland during the 3rd - giving rain and drizzle overnight in much of Ireland and Scotland. The rain slowly cleared from the S. However, one or two heavy falls were accompanied by thunder during the afternoon and early evening over N Ireland and W Scotland. Apart from some light rain in parts of Wales and SW England, most of England and Wales was dry with generally over 10 h of bright sunshine. (Cranwell 24.5C, Warcop 14.4C maximum, Shobdon 6.5C minimum, Aultbea 40.2 mm, Shawbury and Hurn 13.1 h.)

Rainfall on the 4th was, again, largely confined to Ireland and Scotland, although some scattered showers affected parts of SE Ireland, Wales and S England during the day. Falls were mostly light across Scotland and most places (except NW Scotland) had sunny spells during the day. (Writtle 25.2C maximum, Resallach 14.1C maximum, Shobdon 6.9C minimum, Dunstaffnage 9.4 mm, Valley 14.3 h.)

A front pushed across SW England and S Wales early in the day and gave heavy rain in places here on the 5th before an area of low pressure moved into S and then Cent Ireland (1007 mb over Cent Ireland at 2400 GMT). The result during the day was an area of rain and showers across much of S Ireland, Wales and S and Cent England before the evening. Rain also affected N Ireland, W and SW Scotland - and later N England. However, ahead of this rain it was sunny day in Kent, Essex and E Scotland - and also warm in parts of E England. (Santon Downham and Gravesend 25.6C, Killylane 15.2C maximum, Braemar 0.9C minimum, Cardinham 26.6 mm, Dyce 14.4 h.)

Overnight into the 6th rain was widespread, except in N and Cent Scotland and in W Ireland. It was heavy in places although by dawn had largely cleared W and Cent England and S parts of Ireland and Wales. During the day further rain and showers affected Scotland and N parts of England and Ireland, along with East Anglia - with falls becoming lighter as the day progressed. There were some thunderstorms in the afternoon, especially over E and NE England and parts of N Ireland. As the rain moved E'wards it turned sunny from the W, with much of S England having sunny spells. (Heathrow 26.4C, Wick Airport 15.5C maximum, Baltasound 7.0C minimum, Valley 40.6 mm, Camborne 11.3 h.)

A weak ridge made for a mainly dry day on the 7th in S parts. There was some overnight rain in N Scotland while mist and fog patches formed over S and Cent England before dawn. During the day there were some showers across Scotland and N Ireland - although, with most places having S spells during the day, temperatures reached 25C in parts of Cent S and SE England. In the evening a trough brought a spell of rain to places in Ireland. (St James Park 27.2C, Fair Isle 15.8C maximum, Katesbridge 2.6C minimum, Baltasound 9.0 mm, Ronaldsway and St Athan 13.5 h.)

Low pressure and several fronts made for wet conditions at times in most places on the 8th. By dawn must of Ireland and SW Scotland had seen rainfall advancing from the W - and during the day there were further falls across Ireland and much of Scotland (away from the extreme NE). Thunderstorms developed over Kent and W parts of East Anglia during the morning, and became widespread over E and N England and SE Scotland during the day; there were also a few thundery outbreaks over N Ireland. Away from the Northern Isles the day was a rather cloudy one. (Wellesbourne 25.7C, Killylane 15.0C maximum, Braemar 4.5C minimum, Bramham 64.0 mm, Lerwick 13.9 h.)

By dawn on the 9th there was widespread mist and fog across Cent and S Scotland following an overnight fall of rain, heavy in places, in E Britain. The day was dry for many places, but the rain that had cleared E'wards overnight moved W across the Northern Isles to give some very heavy falls here. Six hour rainfall totals at Fair Isle included 0.0 mm ending 0000 GMT and also 0600 GMT, 14 mm ending 1200 GMT, 91 mm ending 1800 GMT and 32 mm ending 2400 GMT. Elsewhere, rain and showers (some of them thundery) affected Ireland during the afternoon, and later Wales and W parts of England before spreading across all but the E of England in the evening. Ahead of the rain there were widespread sunny spells. (Kew Gardens 24.0C, Fair Isle 13.4C maximum, Katesbridge 3.7C minimum, Fair Isle 128.4 mm, Tiree 13.9 h.)

The remnants of ex-hurricane Bertha affected the British Isles on the 10th, the low centre travelling from the SW towards Lincolnshire (990 mb at 1200 GMT) and then offshore E of Aberdeen (979 mb at 2400 GMT). The rain in the Northern Isles had cleared by dawn - by which time rain had turned to showers across much of Ireland as rain, widespread and heavy in places, continued to affect much of England. Thunder affected many parts of England and Wales during the morning or early afternoon. There were many reports of flooding due to the heavy rain, and a tornado was reported at Hull. 18.4mm fell at Wisley in Surrey between 0800 and 0900 GMT with Coventry having 18.2mm in the same time. Winds gusted to 64 mph at Needles and 56 mph at Capel Curig, with 53 mph at Berry Head and 52 mph at Baltasound. In the six hours ending 1500 GMT 57.4 mm of rain fell at Logan Bot Gdns in Wigtownshire. During the day, as the low moved N'wards, so too did the main rain area with the extreme SW areas of the British Isles having a sunny day. Fire crews were called out to protect homes from flooding in Newry, County Down, following heavy rain across many parts of Northern Ireland. Flash flooding also struck areas of Cardiff and Newport. (St James Park 22.7C, Killylane 11.1C maximum, Braemar 1.8C minimum, Logan Botanic Garden 80.0 mm, Cork Airport 10.0 h.)

The remnants of Bertha remained close to Shetland for much of the 11th with Scotland having a generally wet night and day as a result; however, the rain did gradually ease in S areas but remained heavy across N parts of mainland Scotland for much of the day. Further S there were periods of rain and showery outbreaks during the day. Thunder was reported over N Ireland and NW England - with other thundery occurrences from the in the Midlands, East Anglia and S England in the afternoon and evening. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency had almost 40 flood warnings in place, covering Aberdeenshire, Speyside, Moray, Caithness and Sutherland, and Tayside, while Moray Council said it was evacuating about 200 homes at risk of flooding in Elgin. Among the worst affected routes due to rain and high winds were the A838 Durness to Tongue road, which was closed at the south end of Loch Eriboll. The B873 Altnaharra to Syre road has been shut at Grumbeg Bridge, while fallen trees have closed the B827 Skiach to Evanton road. The A835 was also shut by a landslip near Ullapool, disrupting travel between the town and Inverness. Part of the A938 at Duthil near Carrbridge gave away. The Keith Show was cancelled due to the severe weather. Outside Scotland, most places had long sunny spells between any showers. (Coningsby 22.8C, Dalwhinnie 10.6C maximum, Killylane 8.1C minimum, Lossiemouth 113.2 mm, St Helier 12.6 h.) /p>

The remnants of Bertha again remained close to Shetland on the 12th (centred at 986 mb at 2400 GMT). Scotland again had a cloudy and wet day with temperature failing to reach 14C in places. Elsewhere there were sunny spells and showers - some of these were thundery, especially in parts of S Ireland. (Writtle 21.5C, Salsburgh 11.8C maximum, Liscombe 8.6C minimum, Cluanie Inn 65.4 mm, Cork Airport 11.1 h.)

A flow from the NW on the 13th was the result of the slow-moving system near Shetland. Overnight rainfall was largely confined to Scotland, N parts of England and to N and W areas of Ireland while during the day showers became widespread as the rain across Scotland became largely confined to the N. The best of the sunshine was to be found in S England, due to the NW'ly air track. (Cavendish 23.1C, Loch Glascarnoch 12.7C maximum, Shobdon 6.8C minimum, Altnahinch Filters 15.4 mm, Heathrow 10.1 h.)

The N/NW'ly flow continued on the 14th with showers becoming banded into lines during the day. Many places experienced some heavy and, in places, thundery, showers as result. Thunder was most widespread during the afternoon in heavy showers across S England and S Wales. The best of the sunshine was generally found in SW Scotland and W Ireland. Torrential downpours brought flash flooding to several parts of Cardiff and surrounding areas, with a landslip halting trains between Radyr and Taffs Well for a time. In Coryton, shoppers were stranded inside a supermarket after up to a foot of water built up in the car park of the Asda store there. (Hampton Water Works 23.0C, Fair Isle 14.2C maximum, Topcliffe 7.3C minimum, Swyddffynnon 45.0 mm, Tiree 11.5 h.)

High pressure built from the SW during the 15th, with MSL pressure at Valentia at 2400 GMT of 1025.4 mb. Under rising pressure any showers were rather scattered, becoming largely confined to E areas later. After a cloudy and mild start (overnight minimum temperature of 10-11C), light frontal rain affected parts of N Scotland later in the day and evening. Most places had a rather cloudy day. (Swanage 21.7C, Fair Isle 13.4C maximum, Bala 3.7C minimum, Hawarden 8.2 mm, St Helier 11.9 h.)

A low pressure system brought wind and rain across Scotland on the 16th, with a cold front pushing S'wards towards Hull-Dublin by 2400 GMT. Rainfall amounts were light overnight and during the day although skies were rather cloudy throughout the day away from Cent and S England. During the afternoon there were some sunny intervals in N Scotland before further showers occurred. (Heathrow 21.8C, Salsburgh 12.5C maximum, Aboyne 5.9C minimum, Achnagart 9.2 mm, St Helier 12.9 h.)

A cold front cleared S England from the N in the early afternoon on the 17th, although falls of rain along this front were mostly light across England and Wales after dawn. Further frontal rain affected Scotland and Ireland during the day - later moving into N England - although any heavy falls were generally confined to N Scotland. Once rain had cleared there were sunny spells - mostly across Ireland where there were long sunny spells in the W as this area missed the later fronts. Areas of Scotland, notably in the SW, remained rather cloudy all day. (Hurn 21.5C, Dalwhinnie 11.9C maximum, Braemar 8.8C minimum, Cluanie Inn 44.6 mm, Valley and Shannon Airport 10.8 h.)

A cool N'ly flow affected all areas on the 18th with afternoon temperatures only reaching 20C in some parts of S England. Rain and showers were widespread overnight and during the day although all areas, away from Cent Scotland, also had sunny periods. (Thorney Island 21.9C, Loch Glascarnoch 10.5C maximum, Exeter Airport 5.8C minimum, Kinlochewe 27.0 mm, St Athan 9.5 h.)

With pressure rising in the W, the N'ly flow became weaker on the 19th - which was another cool day. Sheltered places from N England S'wards had a slight ground frost before dawn and showers tended to be most widespread in W areas of the British Isles. MSL pressure had reached 1021 mb at Valentia by midnight. (Thorney Island 19.7C, Loch Glascarnoch 11.5C maximum, Tyndrum 3.6C minimum, Lusa 13.4 mm, Prestwick 13.0 h.)

Overnight into the 20th rain was again largely confined to W areas of the British Isles - and also to N Scotland. In this latter area a shallow depression gave more general rain later in the day as it pushed E'wards into NW Scotland by midnight. Away from the N half of Scotland most places had sunny intervals during the day - with longer spells of sunshine in SW England and the Channel Islands. Later in the day the rain across N Scotland pushed further S into N Ireland and Cent Scotland. (Hurn 20.4C, Cluanie Inn 10.5C maximum, Katesbridge 2.1C minimum, Kinlochewe 11.0 mm, St Helier 12.3 h.)

There was a ground frost in parts of the Midlands and Cent S England early on the 21st. Further n, overnight rain affected Scotland and N parts of Ireland and England. Rain across Ireland was caused by fronts, which pushed SE'wards to give rain to all areas of England and Wales by the end of the evening. As the rain cleared from Scotland some thunder was reported in Fife in the afternoon. By midnight another area of rain had spread S'wards into N Scotland - remaining areas of Ireland and Scotland being then largely dry. (Cavendish 19.8C, Blencathra 11.9C maximum, Upper Lambourn 2.1C minimum, Achnagart 28.8 mm, Lerwick 10.0 h.)

A N'ly flow following the passage of fronts across S districts early on the 22nd meant a cool day in all areas. E areas of Scotland had an early ground frost in places while N and W parts of Scotland had some overnight rain. The main areas across England and Wales soon cleared to the S although many places had only slight falls. During the day showery outbreaks (some of them thundery) occurred in many places from time to time, interspersed with sunny periods. (Thorney Island 21.2C, Cluanie Inn 12.5C maximum, Tyndrum 1.8C minimum, Resallach 12.0 mm, Morecambe 11.7 h.)

Pressure rose from the S during the 23rd, reaching 1021 mb on the Channel Islands by 2400 GMT. Further showers and outbreaks of rain occurred overnight, mostly in N and W Scotland and in places in and adjacent to Wales. Under clear skies there was a slight ground frost in places in Cent S England. The outbreaks of rain continued during the day - but SW parts of the UK and much of Cent and S Ireland remained dry during the day. In between the spells of rain most places again had sunny periods with longer spells of sunshine across Ireland and in W parts of the UK. (Thorney Island 20.5C, Loch Glascarnoch 11.4C maximum, Katesbridge 0.4C minimum, Albemarle 11.8 mm, Morecambe 11.5 h.)

The spell of high pressure was short-lived and by 2400 GMT on the 24th frontal rain was affecting much of Ireland, Wales and the W half of England. Away from SW Ireland many sheltered inland areas had a slight ground frost early in the day; in the early hours the temperature dropped to -1.9C at Katesbridge, in County Down - which set a new record for the coldest August night in Northern Ireland. The previous minimum of -1.1C was set in 1964. Overnight it was a mostly dry night but by 0600 GMT frontal rain had pushed into SW Ireland and this rain then made further progress N and E during the day reaching London, Yorkshire and Galloway by midnight. Ahead of the cloud and rain, particularly in W Scotland, there were sunny spells. (Gravesend 20.1C, Loch Glascarnoch 12.1C maximum, Katesbridge -1.9C minimum, Isles of Scilly 8.0 mm, Tiree 13.8 h.)

Most of Scotland had a dry and sunny day on the 25thfollowing a widespread ground frost in the E and a few early fog patches in N Scotland. Overnight, rain was widespread across Ireland, Wales and England and, with the rain moving E'wards, not until later in the day did it clear from Ireland; as a result the Bank Holiday was a dull one outside of Scotland although the SW corner of the UK did see a few breaks in the cloud later as showers followed the rain. The rain was heavy in places at times, particularly in SE England. By 2400 GMT MSL pressure fallen to 993 mb at the centre of a low system just to the S of Ireland by a small anticyclone maintained itself over N Scotland. (Exeter Airport 21.1C, Emley Moor 11.7C maximum, Braemar -2.1C minimum, St James Park 38.4 mm, Tiree 13.8 h.)

The low centred moved along the English Channel on the 26th, gradually filling. N and Cent parts of Scotland had an early ground frost and an air frost in places with some fog patches. Thereafter it was a very sunny day across Scotland, and warm in places here too. Rain and drizzle was widespread across England and Wales overnight - with some falls also in S Ireland; the extreme N of England was largely dry, though. During the day the N extent of the rain gradually moved S'wards, finally clearing S England in the evening. N parts of England and Ireland had sunny periods during the day, and some sunshine was recorded in SW England and S Ireland as skies cleared a little. (Bude 22.5C, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 13.7C maximum, Aviemore -0.7C minimum, Filton 16.8 mm, Tiree 13.9 h.)

Overnight into the 27th it was generally dry across the British Isles with some mist and fog patches in Cent parts of England and E Scotland and with a ground frost in E Scotland. By dawn some light frontal rain was falling in SW England and this then spread to much of Ireland, Wales and W parts of England and SW Scotland by midnight. Much of Ireland and SW England had a dull day; N and Cent Scotland had long sunny spells while elsewhere a sunny morning gradually turned cloudy ahead of the rain. (Santon Downham 21.2C, Fair Isle 14.2C maximum, Tyndrum -0.6C minimum, Plymouth 15.8 mm, Kinloss 13.4 h.)

There was widespread rain at times across many areas (N Scotland excepted) overnight into the 28th with further rain and showers in all areas during the day. There was some isolated thunder in N and W areas with temperatures reaching 20C as far N as parts of N and Cent mainland Scotland. Sunny spells were widespread except in NE Scotland. (Gravesend 23.2C, Fair Isle 13.5C maximum, Aviemore 6.6C minimum, Dundrennan 17.4 mm, Bude 10.0 h.)

Low pressure over N Scotland on the 29th (centre 995 mb at 1200 GMT close to Skye) led to a blustery day. Associated fronts gave spells of rain to most areas although amounts in parts of East Anglia and SE England were minimal during daylight hours. It was a rather cloudy day in many areas - but not on the Channel Islands. (Murlough 21.6C, Salsburgh 13.3C maximum, Aboyne 5.9C minimum, Capel Curig 32.4 mm, St Helier 10.6 h.)

The low centre was slow-moving close to NE Scotland on the 30th, although it did slowly fill. Both overnight and during the day there were spells of rain over England, Scotland, Wales and N Ireland - but falls in much of Ireland and E England were slight and by 2400 GMT the MSL pressure had risen to 1020 mb in SW Ireland. During the day the rain was heaviest and most persistent in mainland N Scotland. Sunshine amounts were quite varied with many regions having both sunny and rather dull locations. (Shoreham 21.9C, Loch Glascarnoch 13.3C minimum, Fyvie Castle 8.7C minimum, Cluanie Inn 34.2 mm, Leconfield 11.3 h.)

Overnight into the 31st there were falls of rain in several areas - most notably in NE Ireland, close to the Mersey and in parts of N Scotland. During the day conditions were mainly dry although approaching fronts from the W brought increasing amounts of cloud with rain and drizzle in W parts of Scotland and Ireland by the evening. By midnight much of Scotland had seen some rain and drizzle - which had also reached NW England. However, ahead of the cloud and away from W Ireland and W Scotland there were long sunny spells. (Shoreham 23.3C, Fair Isle 14.7C maximum, Shobdon 6.0C minimum, Crosby 4.6 mm, St Helier 12.1 h.)

British Isles weather, September 2014

E'ward-moving fronts brought a spell of rain or drizzle to most areas on the 1st. The rain was heavy overnight in parts of N England, and the night was a generally mild one due to the cloud cover. It remained cloudy after the rain in much of Ireland and W Scotland - elsewhere there were sunny intervals once the rain had cleared from the W. (Usk No.2 22.5C, Resallach 14.4C maximum, Santon Downham 7.2C minimum, Walney Island 20.8 mm, Kinloss 7.1 h.)

High pressure (1025 mb at Shannon Airport at 0000 GMT) dominated the weather on the 2nd. Much of Ireland and W and n parts of Scotland remained dull, however; elsewhere the day was a sunny one after early mist and fog had cleared from much of S and Cent England and Wales during the morning. (St Helier 23.3C, Salsburgh 13.7C maximum, Trawscoed 3.9C minimum, Wych Cross 3.6 mm, Dyce 11.7 h.)

The E end of a ridge of high pressure persisted during the 3rd - which was mostly dry as a result. There was a misty/foggy start to the day in parts of S and E England - and it later turned mist in many parts of the British Isles in the evening. Temperatures rose above 22C in the SE corner of England where it was a mainly sunny day. In other areas cloudy skies were rather more persistent. (Whitechurch 23.8C, Fair Isle 13.6C maximum, Katesbridge 2.1C minimum, Wych Cross 0.2 mm, St Helier 11.6 h.)

Although pressure remained mostly high, a cold front edged into W areas of the British Isles later on the 4th. Temperatures by night and day were generally on the warm side - minima of 15C in SW Ireland overnight and maxima of 22C around the Moray Firth. However most places had a rather cloudy day, except on the Channel Islands. Misty conditions were quite widespread around dawn - these soon cleared but by midnight mist was again widespread over the British Isles, with some light rain then falling in the extreme W of Scotland. (Whitechurch 23.7C, Fair Isle 13.3C maximum, Katesbridge 7.4C minimum, Dunstaffnage 1.0 mm, Aberporth 12.0 h.)

A cold front moved slowly SE'wards on the 5th through Scotland and N Ireland, giving light to moderate falls of rain. To the S of this rain widespread mist and fog cleared by late morning in most places - although some districts remained rather hazy all day. Shannon Airport reported 36 mm of rain in the 12 hours ending 1800 GMT due to some heavy showers. Other places to the S of the front generally remained dry - albeit rather cloudy - although showers occurred in NE England ahead of the front. (Myerscough 23.2C, Aviemore 13.0C maximum, Shap 5.3C minimum, Aboyne 11.8 mm, Tiree 9.9 h.)

Fronts and high pressure on the 6th led to a rather cloudy day in many places - although many areas from SW Ireland to SW Scotland did manage a sunny day. Overnight, rain and drizzle fell across parts of Scotland, Ireland and N England - with widespread mist and fog elsewhere over England and Wales by dawn. It remained hazy all day across parts of England, with mist reforming in the S and E in the evening. S England had a mild night and a warm day - while across NE England and N and E parts Scotland there was some heavy rain at times. In many places, however, the day was largely dry. (St Helier 23.4C, Fylingdales 12.3C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 0.5C minimum, Ravensworth 15.2 mm, Ronaldsway 11.0 h.)

An area of low pressure to the E of Scotland gave a N'ly flow to most areas on the 7th, and a wet night to N Scotland overnight. During the day the heaviest rain transferred to NE Scotland and the Northern Isles. Early mist and fog was slow to clear from parts of SE England and it remained rather dull here during the day; elsewhere away from the rain in the NE it was a sunny day generally. (Lee-on-Solent 23.6C, Loch Glascarnoch 10.1C maximum, Swyddffynnon 0.6C minimum, Lerwick 30.4 mm, Ronaldsway 12.3 h.)

A N'ly flow was replaced by high pressure on the 8th (1023 mb in SW Ireland at 2400 GMT). Overnight rain was largely confined to NE Scotland while much of England, E Wales and Cent Ireland had early mist and fog patches. The day was generally a dry one (and quite sunny across much of England) - with mist reforming in the evening over England, Wales and S Ireland. (Hampton Water Works 23.0C, Lerwick 12.2C maximum, Katesbridge -0.1C minimum, Wick Airport 2.8 mm, St Athan 12.0 h.)

High pressure led to a dry and generally sunny day on the 9th, although parts of N Scotland remained rather cloudy. Early mist and fog across England, Wales and S Ireland soon cleared in most places - although in parts of England it did remain rather hazy during the day. (Jersey Airport and St Helier 23.6C, Fair Isle 13.8C maximum, Katesbridge 2.6C minimum, Tiree 0.4 mm, Bude 11.6 h.)

High pressure again dominated the weather on the 10th, leading to a widespread mist or fog by dawn in all but N Scotland. Further mist returned across the British Isles in the evening. However, away from the Northern Isles and some coastal areas, the day was a sunny one, with temperatures reaching 21C as far N as N Scotland as a result. (Bala 22.9C, Fair Isle 14.3C maximum, Katesbridge 2.2C minimum, Herstmonceux 0.2 mm, Thomastown 12.2 h.)

The 11th was another generally dry day under high pressure, although the highest temperatures by day were generally to be found over Ireland and parts of Scotland. Mist and fog, thick in places, was widespread everywhere by dawn - with most areas then having a misty or hazy day, and with the mist returning in all areas in the evening. It was sunless in parts of SE England - elsewhere there were sunny spells once the mist and fog had thinned. (Castlederg 23.0C, Lerwick 14.7C maximum, Santon Downham 3.5C minimum, Tiree 0.4 mm, St Helier 11.7 h.)

Mist was widespread by dawn on the 12th, with a few fog patches at first; the latter persisted all day in parts of NE Scotland. The S of England turned warm, as did many N areas - 23.2C was recorded at Aviemore. Elsewhere, cloud often tended to keep the temperatures a little lower. (Northolt 23.6C, Wick Airport 12.9C maximum, Ravensworth 2.7C minimum, High Wycombe 0.4 mm, St Helier 11.6 h.)

Much of England and E Scotland had a rather cloudy day on the 13th - mist and fog was again widespread by dawn although it generally soon cleared. NE Scotland again remained foggy in places and the sunniest places tended to be across Ireland and W Scotland. Mist reformed across N England, much of Ireland and in Cent and E Scotland in the evening. (Lee-on-Solent 23.3C, Fair Isle 12.4C maximum, Katesbridge 1.9C minimum, Wych Cross 0.2 mm, Tiree 11.2 h.)

High pressure continued to prevail on the 14th - 1032 mb over Shetland in the early morning. The result was another generally dry day. Early fog was largely confined to Ireland - with mist here and across Scotland. This soon cleared and it was then a rather cloudy, but warm, day in most places. Further S there were sunny spells and varying amounts of cloud - with a few showers later in the afternoon from Essex to the S Midlands. (Otterbourne Water Works 22.6C, Killylane 13.7C maximum, Bridgefoot 4.5C minimum, Lentran 0.6 mm, Kinloss 10.3 h.)

High pressure to the N meant an E'ly flow on the 15th - with a front pushing inland over N areas to give some rain during the day. As a result much of mainland Scotland was sunless - as was much of N England while further S cloudy skies led to sunny intervals. Much of England had some early mist or fog which soon cleared - to low cloud in many places. (Hampton Water Works 23.8C, Braemar 13.1C maximum, Aviemore 3.5C minimum, Edinburgh Gogarbank 11.8 mm, Stornoway 10.5 h.)

Overnight rain into the 16th was mostly confined to N and E Scotland, and to NE England. Most areas had early mist and fog - this cleared during the morning but across England a generally hazy day followed. Rain was mostly confined to the Northern Isles during the day - with the sunniest places being in S England. A few locally heavy showers broke out over the S Midlands and in places in SW England and S Wales. (St Helier 27.0C, Inverbervie 13.4C maximum, South Newington 5.7C minimum, Fair Isle 13.6 mm, Bude 10.5 h.)

An E'ly surface flow on the 17th was accompanied by a weak front that brought rain from the E to parts of Scotland and N England. There was widespread mist and some fog by dawn and, although this soon thinned, it did remain hazy all day across many parts of England. Minimum temperatures overnight were as high as 17C in parts of S England and 18C on the Channel Islands. There was a little rain in the SW England and also in SE Ireland from a trough. (Jersey Airport 24.5C, Loftus 13.8C maximum, Aviemore 3.2C minimum, Fair Isle 8.2 mm, Tiree 11.8 h.)

Overnight into the 18th rain was largely confined to the Channel Islands and the Northern Isles, with some lighter rain and drizzle in parts of E England in the onshore E'ly flow. Most other areas had a rather hazy day once early mist or fog had cleared - and further rain affected the Northern Isles during the day. Overnight minimum temperatures were around 17C in places close to the English Channel. Showers and thunderstorms affected parts of the south, especially Hampshire in both the morning and late afternoon, and Wiltshire and Somerset throughout much of the evening; futher rain also fell in the Channel Islands during the day. (Wiggonholt 26.3C, Inverbervie 13.6C maximum, Katesbridge 4.3C minimum, Lerwick 25.2 mm, Manston 9.5 h.)

As a result of invading troughs and fronts on the 19th there was widespread cloud and little sunshine. In S England there was widespread heavy and, in places, thunder rain overnight which pushed slowly N'wards. S Ireland had rainfall during the day - while places close to the E coast and in NE Scotland had some light rain or drizzle. Many areas had early mist or fog, with further mist or fog in the evening. Before dawn, minimum temperatures were again around 15-17C in much of S England. (Charlwood 25.9C, Salsburgh 13.3C maximum, Bridgefoot 6.9C minimum, Exeter Airport 41.2 mm, St Helier 9.8 h.)

High pressure built from the W during the 20th. Overnight it was warm in the S of England - with overnight minimum temperatures around 15-17C in many places here. Mist and fog patches were again widespread by dawn over England and Wales - while thunderstorms occurred to the N and W of London around dawn. There was rain overnight in S Ireland and patchy falls across the UK - these falls gradually lessened in the W during the day. Most of England and Wales was sunless during the day - there were sunny spells elsewhere, especially later in the day. (St Helier 24.7C, Fylingdales 12.8C maximum, Kinbrace 7.9C minimum, High Wycombe 17.2 mm, Tiree 9.8 h.)

High pressure over the British Isles on the 21st (centre 1029 mb over Wales at 2400 GMT) led to a mostly dry day in all areas. There was a touch of ground frost in parts of mainland Scotland while air minima in Cornwall were around 15C in places. Parts of East Anglia, the London area and the Northern Isles had some rain and drizzle overnight - and elsewhere there were widespread patches of mist and fog by dawn which cleared by mid-morning. Scotland had a hazy day with cloudy skies - and a return to mist in the evening. Elsewhere it was dry by day with sunny spells. (Porthmadoc 21.4C, Lerwick 11.4C maximum, Tyndrum 0.6C minimum, Kenley 1.0 mm, Glasgow, Aberporth and Thomastown 11.4 h.)

Although pressure remained high during the 22nd, a cold front brought cloud and rain into W parts of Ireland and Scotland later in the day. Some sheltered areas had a ground frost overnight and mist and fog patches were widespread in all areas by dawn. These soon cleared during the day and most areas then had sunny spells ahead of the frontal cloud. The exception was NW Scotland - by early evening rain and drizzle was falling in places W of a line from NW Ireland to Shetland. (Coton-In-The-Elms 20.8C, Fair Isle 12.4C maximum, Redesdale Camp 1.1C minimum, Achnagart 7.2 mm, Lyneham 10.9 h.)

During the 23rd fronts crossed most areas from the NW with only the extreme SE of England remaining dry. To the south of the rain across Scotland, there was widespread mist and fog patches by dawn. As the rain areas moved SE the rainfall intensity weakened. It was a dull day across Ireland, W and S Scotland and N England. (Donna Nook 19.9C, Dalwhinnie 12.5C maximum, Shobdon 1.6C minimum, Achnagart 18.0 mm, St Helier 10.2 h.)

There were widespread falls of rain overnight which moved SE'wards - and had almost cleared SE England by dawn on the 24th. Pressure rose behind the rain area and it was a mainly dry day across the British Isles as a result. However, cloud across NW Scotland later in the day heralded further frontal rain that fell across much of Scotland by midnight. (Lee-on-Solent 20.2C, Loch Glascarnoch 12.2C maximum, Katesbridge 5.8C minimum, Capel Curig 11.0 mm, St Helier 9.5 h.)

Overnight rain was mostly confined to N Scotland on the 25th - albeit with lesser falls further S. There were slight falls of rain and drizzle as fronts moved SE'wards during the day - although in many areas it was cloudy and generally dry. Only in S England and the Channel Island was there much sunshine - and it was quite a warm and humid day here. (Helens Bay 21.1C, Baltasound 13.7C maximum, Benson 1.6C minimum, Harris Quidnish 10.6 mm, St Helier 10.8 h.)

During the 26th cold fronts cleared SE'wards over N Britain and Ireland - giving a day of sunny spells across much of Scotland and Ireland, ad later in N parts of England and Wales. Rain and showers fell during the day in N Scotland. Further S it was a cloudier day with some outbreaks of rain and drizzle in places. Some mist and fog patches formed in the evening over Wales and the Midlands. (St James Park 22.2C, Lerwick 12.3C maximum, Castlederg 8.1C minimum, Achnagart 20.6 mm, Leuchars 9.7 h.)

Most places on the 27th were dry and cloudy, with a lack of sunshine in many parts of W Scotland, Wales and S England. NW parts of Scotland had some rain at times during the day - while the best of the sunshine was to be found in E England, N England and S Scotland. It was mild for the time of the year in SE areas, where it was also warm and humid - mist formed in S England in the evening. (Jersey Airport 22.6C, Dalwhinnie 13.2C maximum, Katesbridge 0.0C minimum, Kirkwall 5.6 mm, St Helier 10.5 h.)

There was a misty start to the day in the S half of England on the 28th and it remained hazy here until late morning. In Scotland there was some rainfall in the extreme N overnight. Patchy cloud and sunny intervals affected all other areas during the day and it was a warm day in SE England. (Northolt 24.7C, Lerwick 12.9C maximum, Topcliffe 7.3C minimum, Stornoway 9.8 mm, Aberporth 8.3 h.)

Fog was thick in places early on the 29th across S England - but soon cleared although in places it remained rather misty or hazy all day. N and W Scotland in particular had some overnight rain, as did parts of Ireland. During the day showery rain moved NE across much of England and Wales, while it was Scotland that saw the best of the sunshine - although in the Northern Isles it remained rather dull with some rain and drizzle. Thunder was reported over SE Wales to the Midlands later in the day. Light rain and drizzle also affected N and W parts of Ireland later. (Coton-in-the-Elms 21.7C, Baltasound 12.4C maximum, Aboyne 3.7C minimum, Trawscoed 11.2 mm, Tiree 8.9 h.)

Much of England had patchy mist and fog to start the 30th - although this largely cleared by mid-morning. Showers fell across many parts of S England in the morning while a cold front brought outbreaks of rain into W parts of Ireland and Scotland by midday. This cloud and rain then moved slowly E'wards, although over much of England it remained warm with sunny spells with the front reaching E Scotland and Wales by midnight. (Northolt 23.0C, Lerwick 13.0C maximum, Altnaharra 5.0C, Scarborough 10.0 mm, St Helier 8.3 h.)

British Isles weather, October 2014

Areas of patchy rain affected parts of the British Isles on the 1st; the first cleared away to the SE early in the day before further falls spread from the W during the morning, with some rain reaching the Midlands in the evening. Brighter conditions followed from the NW later, and in most places it was a warm or very warm day. (Frittenden 22.0C, Resallach 12.0C maximum, Eskdalemuir 2.9C minimum, Tiree 6.6 mm, Tiree 9.1 h.)

High pressure briefly affected most areas on the 2nd with MSL pressure reaching around 1030 mb in S England for a time. Some mist and fog patches affected parts of S and Cent England briefly around dawn - while N areas had a slight air frost in places. The day was generally dry with many areas having sunny spells - although E areas of England were a notable exception to this. During the afternoon and evening rain spread E'wards into W parts of Scotland and Ireland. (Shobdon 22.7C, Lerwick 12.6C maximum, Redesdale Camp -2.1C minimum, Lusa 1.8 mm, Valley 10.4 h.)

A cold front crossed E'wards over much of Scotland and Ireland by the end of the 3rd, later stalling as a wave depression (centre 1007 mb) formed over the southern Irish Sea by 2400 GMT. Overnight there were some heavy falls of rain in W parts of Scotland and Ireland with windy conditions - the winds gradually eased and these heavy falls moved E'wards to affect parts of SE Ireland, S Scotland and N England by the evening. Elsewhere, most of England and Wales had a dry day with sunny spells after early mist or fog patches - which returned to SE England later in the evening. It was warm in S England and thunder was heard at Ronaldsway in the late afternoon. (Benson 23.0C, Killylane 11.0C maximum, Shobdon 5.2C minimum, Eskdalemuir 42.8 mm, Odiham 8.1 h.)

A cold front pushed SE'wards during the 4th allowing a ridge of high pressure to build in its wake. Overnight there was a spell of prolonged rain in places from SW England through Wales and NW England to E Scotland with over 50 mm falling in places in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT. 24-hour totals to the same time included 78 mm at Ronaldsway, 77 mm at St Bees Head and 76 mm at Carlisle. During the morning and early afternoon the rain then moved quickly SE'wards to clear SE England - although falls were generally light and short-lived. Most places had sunny periods after the rain, particularly in E Ireland. A dusting of snow was recorded at the top of the Cairngorms as the first snowfalls of the season were blown in across Scotland's higher summits. (Shoeburyness 20.8C, Lerwick 8.3C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule 2.1C minimum, Valley 58.2 mm, Casement Aerodrome 9.8 h.)

The 5th brought a deep area of low pressure and strengthening winds towards NW areas with MSL pressure down to about 985 mb in NW Ireland by 2400 GMT. There was a widespread inland ground frost in Britain before dawn with some mist and fog forming in Cent and S England. Rain spread into Wales and W Scotland during the day with some heavy falls in SE Ireland. In E England it was a sunny day although temperatures remained below normal - further W and N it was rather cloudy. At Valentia 12 mm of rain fell in the 12 hours ending 1800 GMT. (Gravesend 17.6C, Dalwhinnie 10.5C maximum, Aboyne -1.8C, Lusa 8.2 mm, Heathrow 9.0 h.)

Overnight it was wet and windy in W areas as fronts moved E'wards - later passing across much of the UK by the end of the 6th. According to the Met Office high rainfall totals during 2100 GMT on the 5th to 0900 GMT on the 6th included 44.8 mm at Camborne, 43.8 mm at Llynfrynach (Powys) and 41.4 mm at South Uist Range. Strong gusts in the period included 84 mph at South Uist Range, 78 mph at Altnaharra, 77 mph at Tiree and 75 mph at Machrihanish. By dawn only a small area of E England remained dry (but cloudy - and it remained cloudy here throughout the day). Winds eased off during the morning and milder but showery weather followed the main rain area from the W. In the afternoon and evening thunder was heard in W Ireland, Ronaldsway, SW England and the Channel Islands. (Plymouth 17.3C, Fylingdales 8.9C maximum, Santon Downham 1.2C minimum, Dalwhinnie 52.0 mm, Dublin Airport 8.5 h.)

Rain and showers affected most areas during the 7th with mist and fog, thick in places, in many areas of England by dawn. In N Scotland the rain was rather more prolonged and it was a sunless day here, while much of S England and S Ireland had a largely sunny day in between the showers. During the morning thunder was reported in parts of Cent S England, the Channel Islands and SW England - with further thunder in parts of S Ireland and Cornwall in the evening. (Exeter Airport and St Helier 15.8C, Fylingdales 8.1C maximum, Shap -2.8C minimum, Lossiemouth 45.6 mm, Tiree 9.6 h.)

Low pressure was never far from SW Ireland during the 8th, with a centre of 983 mb at 2400 GMT close to Cork. Overnight it was wet in N Scotland and also in SW England and S Ireland with this rain spreading E'wards before dawn. IN S Scotland and NE Ireland there was some ground frost before dawn. Ireland, Wales and England had widespread rain during the day - and lighter falls persisted across parts of N Scotland. The rain turned to showers with some thunder reported over Wales and S Ireland, and also in SW England and parts of the N Midlands and E England. Most places had a little sunshine, generally 1-3 hours. (St Helier 19.4C, Lake Vyrnwy 10.3C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule 0.1C minimum, Lentran 41.4 mm, Tiree 9.9 h.)

An area of low pressure moved from SW Ireland to the Shetlands during the 9th, leading to a generally unsettled day. Cent Scotland had a cool start to the day but in S England overnight minimum temperatures were in excess of 12C in places as many areas had a spell of overnight rain that turned to showers. Rain and showers continued during the day with the best of any sunshine being in S parts of England and Ireland. The low brought blustery conditions and there was some thunder in the showers across S England throughout the day. (Jersey Airport 19.3C, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 0.3C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 0.8C minimum, Tredegar Bryn Bach Park 32.0 mm, St Helier 8.6h.)

Cyclonic conditions, albeit with only moderate winds, continued during the 10th. There was some mist and fog around dawn in Cent and S England and in parts of N Ireland - but the main weather features of the day were rain and showers - again associated with thundery outbreaks in S England and the Channel Islands. N parts of the British Isles had a cool day with a surface flow from the N or NE, while the S had frequent sunny spells. (St Helier 20.0C, Dalwhinnie 10.1C maximum, Katesbridge 0.5C minimum, Charlwood 23.0 mm, Waddington 8.8 h.)

Overnight into the 11th mist and fog formed quite widely across the British Isles with many N areas having a ground frost. S England, in particular, had overnight rain and there were also outbreaks in many W areas of the UK. Further rain and showers followed during the day in most areas - but more widely in Cent and S parts of England and Wales. There were thunderstorms in parts of England and Wales, mainly in the south and east; most areas also had some sunny spells. (St Helier 18.4 17.7C, Loch Glascarnoch 10.6C maximum, Katesbridge -2.1C minimum, Manston 23.6 mm, Dublin Airport 10.0 h.)

On the 12th early fog and mist was again widespread over S Scotland, England, Wales and Ireland, while there were some outbreaks of rain across parts of Scotland. The fog was slow to clear in some parts of the Midlands and S England - while frontal rain spread into S England in the afternoon from the S. Rain and showers were also frequent over N Scotland and NW Wales - elsewhere, the day was mainly dry although the rain in the S moved into East Anglia and the Midlands in the evening. Away from S England, which was dull, there were spells of sunshine. It was a wet day in the Channel Islands with 23 mm falling at Jersey Airport in the 12 hours ending 1800 GMT. (Ballywatticock 17.8C, Loch Glascarnoch 9.0C maximum, Katesbridge -1.0C minimum, St Catherine's Point 13.6 mm, Morecambe 10.0 h.)

A low pressure area moved the Channel Islands (994 mb at 0000 GMT) to Essex on the 13th. This led to some heavy rain across S England and the Midlands overnight (especially in parts of the London area) - which then extended into N England during the day. Ireland and N England had some early fog patches and there was an air frost over parts of N and Cent Scotland. Most of England and Wales had a dull day although elsewhere it was generally dry (except in E Scotland) with varying amounts of sunshine. (East Malling 17.4C, Dalwhinnie 8.3C maximum, Altnaharra -3.7C minimum, Hampstead 57.0 mm, Stornoway 6.9 h.)

Low pressure remained close to E England on the 14th and associated fronts gave, at best, a cloudy day here. Rain across England and Wales overnight and into the morning tended to move E'wards; in the afternoon remaining patchy light rain and drizzle in E England gave way to widespread mist and some fog patches. Parts of Cent Scotland had a touch of air frost at first and much of N and cent Scotland then remained rather cloudy with the best of the sunshine during the day being found across S Scotland and N Ireland. In much of N England temperatures barely rose above 10-12C during the day. (Charsfield 18.5C, Pennerley 8.4C maximum, Kinbrace -2.6C minimum, Fylingdales 40.0mm, Thomastown 7.4 h.)

Cent and S parts of England and wales had early mist, fog and drizzle on the 15th while in Cent Scotland there was an air frost in places. By dawn light rain and drizzle was widespread across Ireland and this spread NE'wards into Wales and the W half of England by the late afternoon. S Scotland had light rain in the evening while N and E Scotland were the sunniest regions with sunny spells during the day. A trough brought some heavy and thundery showers to SW England and the Channel Islands in the evening. (Chivenor 17.6C, Pateley Bridge Ravens Nest 9.6C maximum, Braemar -1.5C minimum, Capel Curig 19.0 mm, Stornoway 8.7 h.)

N'ward-moving fronts made only slow progress on the 16th leading to a cool day across N Scotland ahead of the rain, but a warmer day to the S. Mist and fog was widespread around dawn over England and rain was widespread here overnight, and also in S Scotland, Wales and E Ireland. During the day rain tended to fall as showers across England, Wales and Ireland, and it slowly diminished in intensity over S and E Scotland. In the S some of the showers were thundery in parts of Ireland and SW England. (Rhyl 18.5C, Braemar 9.5C maximum, Aboyne 0.4C minimum, Killylane 52.4 mm, Manston 5.7 h.)

During the 17th most places (although E England tended to remain dry) were affected by bands of rain that resulted from passing fronts or troughs - associated with the cyclonic flow around a large depression to the W or Ireland MSL pressure fell to 987 mb in W Ireland by 2400 GMT. Although Shetland and extreme NE of Scotland remained cool (maximum temperatures below 13C), elsewhere it turned mild due to the S'ly flow. W Ireland remained rather dull but elsewhere there were sunny intervals. (Writtle 20.2C, Fair Isle 10.7C maximum, Baltasound 5.3C minimum, Capel Curig 28.6 mm, Leconfield 6.6 h.)

Overnight into the 18th it was mild in all areas, with minimum temperatures of 15-17C in much of S England and S Wales. Overnight rain gradually cleared away NE'wards during the late morning to give a day of showers and sunshine. However, it remained rather dull in S Ireland and SW England, and in S Wales and parts of N England. The winds gradually eased as the day wore on, after a windy night - especially in the W. (St Helier 22.3C, Fair Isle 14.1C maximum, Lerwick 9.5C minimum, Shap 42.0 mm, Ronaldsway 7.9 h.)

Overnight into the 19th rainfall was widespread although during the day rain was mainly confined to Ireland, Scotland, wales and NW England. As a result E England had long sunny spells, and it was warm in the SE. The rain and showers in the W heralded a change in wind direction from the SW to W and falls were heavy in places; it was a windy day in N and W areas. (Heathrow 20.7C, Dalwhinnie 11.6C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 8.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 61.2 mm, St helier 7.9 h.)

For much of the 20th there was a brisk W'ly flow across much of the British Isles but in the evening pressure fell to 983mb in the Western Isles as the remains of former hurricane Gonzalo reached the British Isles. Rain and showers were largely confined to the W half of the British Isles, particularly in the afternoon and evening due to the fronts associated with the arriving low. Elsewhere it was also rather cloudy with the best of any sunshine being recorded in parts of E Scotland and SE England. Winds increased later in the day as the low approached from the W. (St Helier 18.0C, Spadeadam 10.5C maximum, Kinbrace 5.3C minimum, Achnagart 13.4 mm, Manston 6.7 h.)

By 1200 GMT on the 21st the remains of Gonzalo were just N of Shetland, where the central pressure was 979 mb. The result was a windy night, particularly in N areas, with rainfall in most places. Peak gusts included 70 mph at Needles Old battery and Aberdaron, and 69 mph at St Bees Head. During the day, as the flow turned NW'ly, rain gave way to showers - some which fell as hail. Most places, away from N Scotland, had sunny spells during the day, but it turned cooler as the low system moved away to the NE. (Shoeburyness 16.1C, Dalwhinnie 6.0C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 4.1C minimum, Cluanie Inn 50.6 mm, Edinburgh Gogarbank and Dublin Airport 8.0 h.)

The N edge of an area of high pressure affected S areas on the 22nd; elsewhere further fronts made progress E'wards across much of the British Isles during the day. There was rain overnight in NW Ireland and W and N Scotland - this then spread to most other areas during the day - although some places in S England remained dry. (St Helier 16.3C, Carterhouse 9.7C maximum, Topcliffe 2.1C minimum, Lusa 30.8 mm, Manston 4.8 h.)

The 23rd was a rather cloudy day due to the E'wards movement of fronts across most areas. Temperatures were generally mild for the time of year and rainfall was heaviest across Scotland - most other regions experienced little more than light rain and drizzle. (Leeming 17.6C, Lerwick 11.2C maximum, Fylingdales 7.1C minimum, Achnagart 35.6 mm, Boulmer 3.4 h.)

Many places saw overnight rain into the 24th - which had a mild start across most of England and Wales with minimum temperatures of 10-12C, and 13-14C in S England. Further outbreaks of rain and showers continued during the day - many places had little sunshine as a result. In SE England temperatures climbed above 17C in many places, giving a warm day. (Gravesend 17.9C, Tulloch Bridge 8.2C maximum, Kinbrace 2.9C minimum, Achnagart 29.4 mm, Kirkwall 5.5 h.)

A brisk SW'ly flow prevailed for much of the 25th in N areas with MSL pressure falling to 988 mb on N Shetland by 2400 GMT. A slow-moving front gave a wet day across Scotland - with W Ireland and Wales also having some heavy spells of rain at times. E parts of the England remained generally dry, with sunny spells over E parts of the UK during the day. Although it was mild here, S coastal areas of England had a rather cloudy day. (St Helier 17.0C, Loch Glascarnoch 9.4C maximum, Shobdon 2.5C minimum, Kinlochewe 47.0 mm, Wattisham 8.9 h.)

Anticyclonic conditions prevailed across S areas on the 26th with N England and Cent Ireland (and places to the N) being affected by slow-moving fronts. Some persistent heavy rain fell overnight and during the day in NW Scotland in particular. Other areas of Scotland also had a wet day with falls of rain in Ireland too. Some high ground in Wales and N England had some rain - elsewhere it was dry but cloudy. Only a few places in E Scotland and NE England had much more than an hour of sunshine on mainland Britain or Ireland - although the Channel Isles were much brighter. (Murlough 16.9C, Baltasound 8.9C maximum, Baltasound 6.2C minimum, Kinlochewe 106.2 mm, St Helier 4.0 h.)

A warm sector spread N'wards during the 27th to envelope much of the British Isles by midnight. Overnight minimum temperatures were close to 14C in parts of S England while maximum temperatures reached 16C around the Moray Firth during in the day. Rainfall was heaviest across NW Scotland and was mostly confined to Scotland and N Ireland. Away from East Anglia and SE England it was generally a dull day with almost no sunshine across Ireland and Scotland. (Santon Downham 19.7C, Lerwick 10.5C maximum, Kinbrace 4.5C minimum, Achnagart 68.2 mm, St Helier 9.2 h.)

There was further rain into the 28th across Scotland and Ireland - with prolonged, heavy falls in W parts of Scotland and Ireland. Across England there was widespread mist and fog by dawn. Overnight minimum temperatures remained above 14C in parts of E Scotland while there was a value of 15.1C at Shannon Airport. The rain moved S'wards into Wales and N England during the day, reaching SW England and the N Midlands by evening - and S England by late evening. Drier weather followed the movement of the rainbelt S'wards as a weak ridge built from the W. Landslides closed several roads across Scotland; the A835 Ullapool was closed for several hours because of a landslide at Garve. The Met Office issued an amber warning of rain for the Highlands, as well as yellow warnings covering parts of Perthshire, Fife, Strathclyde and the south west. In Edinburgh, Balcarres Street has flooded. People living in neighbouring flats put up their flood gates to stop the water from entering their homes. Meanwhile, the A82 was closed for a short time between Tarbet and Crianlarich. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency issued flood warnings for large parts of Perthshire and Tayside, Skye, Lochaber, Speyside and Easter Ross. Flood alerts were also in place for Argyll and Bute, Wester Ross and Caithness. The Met Office said that since the 25th the worst-affected parts of the Scotland had seen three-day rainfall totals in excess of 150 mm, with over 250 mm in some parts of the Highlands since the 24th. Ahead of the rain 19C was reached in parts of S England with much of S and E England (away from the coasts) having a sunny day. (Hull East Park 20.1C, Lentran 7.9C maximum, Stornoway 4.5C minimum, Achnagart 56.6 mm, St Helier 9.3 h.)

Despite the presence of a weak ridge on the 29th, frontal cloud gave a dull day with rain across S England. Overnight minimum temperatures here were as high as 15C in places along the S coast. By dawn there had been a widespread ground frost over N and Cent Ireland, Scotland and N England - with a slight air frost in places here. Some early mist and fog affected parts of N England and N Ireland. N Scotland and parts of E England had some overnight rain, while during the day the rain in the S spread into Midlands and parts of Wales; there were also falls across Ireland and NW England later. E Scotland and areas around the N half of the Irish Sea had the sunniest conditions by day. (Bude 17.1C, Lentran 8.1C maximum, Eskdalemuir -2.0C minimum, Isle of Portland 29.6 mm, Valley 7.1 h.)

Rain spread N'wards overnight to reach NE Scotland by dawn on the 30th - and leading to widespread mist and fog over much of England, Wales and Ireland by dawn. Ahead of the rain there was a slight air frost in parts of N Scotland while in S England minimum temperatures were in the range 12-15C. During the day rainfall was mainly confined to Ireland, and to W and N parts of Scotland. The air in the S was humid and there was a widespread mist or fog in the S'ly airflow by midnight. (Gravesend 20.2C, Lentran 8.9C maximum, Baltasound -0.7C minimum, South Uist 12.2 mm, St Helier 8.5 h.)

The 31st was a unusually warm day for the time of year with temperatures reaching 20C as far N as N Wales and Lincolnshire. In fact it was the warmest day this late in the year on record by several degrees C, according to the Met Office. Ireland and Scotland had a rather dull day with rain and drizzle; most areas had a rather dull day although there was extensive sunshine across much of SE and Cent S England. (Kew Gardens and Gravesend 23.6C, Lerwick 11.5C maximum, Altnaharra 6.9C minimum, Lusa 20.6 mm, St Helier 8.7 h.)

British Isles weather, November 2014

Cold fronts brought rain across the British Isles overnight on the 1st, before clearing from East Anglia during mid-morning. Ahead of the rain it was mild in the SE with overnight minimum temperatures of 14-15C in places. Further bands of rain affected many areas during the day - especially Ireland and W parts of Britain before early evening. By midnight many parts of E Scotland and NE England had received further pulse of rainfall - with the best of any sunshine during the day generally in E areas. (Writtle 18.7C, Dalwhinnie 9.5C maximum, Tain Range 5.7C minimum, Whitechurch 32.0 mm, St Helier 7.6 h.)

Low pressure to the W of Ireland on the 2nd (MSL pressure at 2400 GMT was down to 986 mb in parts of W Scotland and NW Ireland) brought further bands of rain to the UK during the day. Overnight rain fell in most places although extreme E parts of East Anglia and SE England stayed mostly dry. During the day rain was mostly confined to England and Wales with showery falls in W Ireland and W Scotland later. E Ireland saw the best of the day's sunshine - with much of E England staying dull until sunset. (Gravesend 16.9C, Dalwhinnie 8.0C maximum, Lough Fea 4.8C minimum, Achnagart 41.6 mm, Dublin Airport 7.1 h.)

A low centre moved from W of Ireland to SW Scotland during the 3rd with MSL pressure down to 982 mb over E Ireland at 1200 GMT. A separate low centre also crossed N Scotland during the day. There was a widespread ground frost in E Scotland before dawn with rainfall elsewhere overnight. Further rainfall during the day affected Ireland, Wales, Scotland and S Scotland and N Ireland. (Mumbles Head 13.3C, Altnahinch Filters 4.2C maximum, Tain Range -1.3C minimum, Capel Curig 29.8 mm, Leconfield 7.4 h.)

Mist and fog patches were widespread across England and S Scotland in particular by dawn on the 4th with rainfall and showers in most areas further W. In the Channel Islands these showers were thunder before dawn. Parts of S Scotland, N England and the Midlands also had a slight overnight air frost. The mist and fog cleared by late morning with showery rain then affecting many areas of the British Isles during the day. Across Scotland there was some hill snow at upper levels. (Gravesend 14.1C, Pennerley 5.7C maximum, South Newington -2.0C minimum, Redesdale Camp 19.8 mm, Cork Airport 7.3 h.)

The 5th dawned generally cool with a widespread ground frost. Cent and SE parts of England had early mist and fog patches that cleared by late morning with showery outbreaks of rain further W and N. During the day under a weak ridge of high pressure, rainfall was largely confined to places close to the E coast of Britain in N'ly flow. SW England also had some rainfall during the morning - while as temperatures fell again in the evening snow and snow grains were reported at Aviemore and Capel Curig. Showers across N Scotland led to a dull day here - elsewhere it was quite a sunny day away from E coast areas. (Scolton Country Park 13.6C, Aviemore 4.9C maximum, Tulloch Bridge -2.3C minimum, Shoeburyness 17.8 mm, Morecambe 8.4 h.)

The 6th dawned with a widespread air frost except in Ireland, W Scotland and SW England. This was accompanied by mist and fog in many areas of England. The frost-free areas in the W were cloudy with some heavy frontal rain - 18 mm fell in the 12 hours ending 0600 GMT at Belmullet. During the day this rain spread slowly E'wards to reach the E of England in the evening - giving some heavy falls in W areas. Ahead of the rain there was some sunshine in E England and in places close to the Thames Estuary, in particular. Elsewhere, the day was a dull one. (Isles of Scilly 14.7C, Fylingdales 7.4C maximum, South Newington -3.8C minimum, Lough Fea 51.6 mm, Manston 6.2 h.)

Cyclonic conditions, due to low pressure to the W of Ireland, affected all areas on the 7th. Rainfall was widespread overnight, generally clearing E'wards from Ireland but giving some heavy falls in W Scotland. During the day the rain slowly eased off across Scotland and much of Ireland remained dry until rain and showers affected W areas in the afternoon and evening. Falls were heavy across Wales while the best of the sunshine was to be found in Ireland and W Scotland. Thunder was reported in the afternoon in rain in parts of E Yorkshire. (Santon Downham 14.2C, Lake Vyrnwy 7.8C maximum, Katesbridge 2.1C minimum, Whitechurch 44.0 mm, Magilligan 6.4 h.)

A depression moved from SW of Ireland to NE Scotland on the 8th (centre 987 mb at 1200 GMT close to Dublin). This brought outbreaks of rain, sometimes heavy, to many areas - moving generally NE'wards with the low. There were clearer skies with a widespread ground frost over N and E Scotland at first; this led to a sunny morning across Scotland before cloud arrived from the SW - while it turned brighter across Ireland once the low had cleared. It was mild in SE England with temperatures reaching 14C in places. (Gravesend 15.1C, Killylane 5.5C maximum, Aboyne -1.9C minimum Middle Wallop 22.2 mm, Kinloss 6.2 h.)

There was some heavy rain overnight in the extreme SE of England and in parts of East Anglia - with damp conditions early on the 9th leading to widespread mist and fog patches across England in general. There was also an air frost in parts of Cent Scotland and W England - with places from Wales to E Scotland also having moderate accumulations of overnight rain. Troughs associated with low pressure over Ireland brought further rain here and to parts of W Britain during the day; this rain was mainly showery with thunder in the Channel Islands and Cornwall in particular. In the evening, as temperatures fell, there were reports of snow at Aviemore, while mist and fog became widespread over much of England, Scotland and NE Ireland. (Isle of Portland 14.2C, Lentran 4.3C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -2.9C minimum, Frittenden 27.0 mm, Filton 7.2 h.)

Conditions overnight into the 10th ranged from a widespread air frost over N and Cent Scotland (away from the coasts), widespread mist and fog over much of England, N Ireland and S and E Scotland, and rainfall over S Wales and S England - the latter being associated with thunderstorms over the Channel Islands and close to the S coast of England before dawn. Further showers occurred over S England during the day - while more general frontal rain spread across Ireland by the evening, and then into Wales, W England and SW Scotland. Some snow fell later in the day across high ground in Scotland while mist and fog again formed in NE England and E Scotland in the evening. (Gravesend 14.5C, Aviemore 2.1C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -4.3C minimum, Cardinham 21.6 mm, Stornoway 5.7 h.)

Parts of E and N Scotland had an air frost early on the 11th - further S there was widespread frontal cloud with rain in W and cent parts of the British Isles leading to a mild night in much of England. This frontal rain made little progress E'wards during the day with many E areas of England and Scotland remaining fairly dry by the evening. Away from the extreme SE of England and East Anglia it was a rather dull, sunless day for most - although rainfall was generally light in many places. (Wisley 14.5C, Spadeadam 9.0C maximum, Altnaharra -3.0C minimum, Ballypatrick Forest 37.0 mm, Manston 6.1 h.)

Frontal cloud and rain moved NE'wards across all areas during the 12th, introducing a S'ly flow to all areas by midnight with MSL pressure down to 984 mb in W Ireland by that time. As the rain pushed away there were sunny periods across the S half of Ireland and England and over much of Wales. (Lusa 14.6C, Lake Vyrnwy 9.2C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule 5.5C minimum, Katesbridge 29.2 mm, Bude 6.6 h.)

Low pressure remained centred close to SE Ireland for much of the 13th and led to a wet day for much of Ireland as a result. Overnight heavy rain was confined to SW Ireland and parts of W Scotland with a few showers in S England. By the evening much of W Britain and all of Ireland had seen rain from the Irish low - with falls across E Britain and N Scotland in the evening. Away from the extreme SW corner of SW England and the Shetlands it was a generally sunless day. (Chivenor 15.8C, Derrylin Cornahoule 6.8C maximum, Cranwell 4.0C minimum, Ballypatrick Forest 30.6 mm, Lerwick 3.2 h.)

The 14th dawned after a wet night across Ireland Wales, W and Cent S England and parts of Scotland as a cold front moved NE'wards across these areas. By midday it had cleared SE England and cleared E Scotland in the evening, with widespread mist and fog (thick in places) forming in E Britain in the evening. Following the rain there were sunn spells in Cent and S England, Wales and Ireland - and temperatures reached 14C in S England in the afternoon. (Lusa 15.5C, Banagher Caugh Hill 9.4C maximum, Strathallan 4.1C minimum, Katesbridge 31.0 mm, Yeovilton 6.1 h.)

Overnight into the 15th rainfall was largely confined to E Ireland, the Northern Isles, Wales and SW England - with widespread mist and fog in much of E Britain. Some sleet and snow was reported over high ground in Cumbria and the highlands overnight. In many places mist and fog lingered all day, becoming more widespread over the British Isles in the evening. Much of E Britain consequently had a dull day. Showers, especially in the south of England gave small amounts of rain and these were locally thundery in SW England. More persistent rain continued to affect the Northern Isles during the day. (Hurn 14.8C, Aviemore 3.4C maximum, Drumnadrochit -1.4C minimum, Fair Isle 18.8 mm, Valley 7.6 h.)

Fog was widespread overnight into the 16th with much of N and E Scotland having frontal rain overnight. Another area of widespread rain also affected S England and the Channel Islands overnight. Mist and fog was again persistent in much of E Britain throughout the day while a low pressure system (centre 997 mb over Norfolk at 2400 GMT) gave a wet day to S England and East Anglia. The best of the sunshine was to be found across Ireland and in neighbouring parts of the UK with most of N Scotland, S England and E Britain remaining mostly dull. (Plymouth 13.4C, Drumalbin 5.0C maximum, Capel Curig -0.6C minimum, Dyce 24.2 mm, Tiree 5.8 h.)

Low pressure remained close to SE England during the 17th, and a mainly E'ly flow spread into the UK as a result. Much of Britain had rainfall overnight with falls also in N Ireland. Jersey reported thunder during mid-morning and many places had outbreaks of rain or drizzle during the day - especially in the E of Britain and S England. In many regions it was also a dull and, therefore, cool day. (Logan Botanic Garden 13.0C, Pennerley 7.5C maximum, Katesbridge 1.2C minimum, Redesdale Camp 20.0 mm, Morecambe 3.0 h.)

The flow from the E was maintained on the 18th. Overnight widespread mist and fog formed across the British Isles and there were some light falls of rain in parts of E Britain and N Scotland. These showery outbreaks continued during the day, heavy in places - and the mist returned widely in the evening. A few of the showers were heavy although, away from North Sea coasts, most places reported sunny periods. (Lee-on-Solent and Northolt 13.9C, Okehampton 8.2C maximum, Hawarden 0.4C minimum, St Catherines Point 14.2 mm, Valley 7.8 h.)

High pressure (MSL pressure 1029 mb over Shetland at 2400 GMT) again brought air from the E and SE across the British Isles on the 19th. There was no overnight air frost at low levels partly due to the widespread mist across England by dawn. Cloudy skies brought some overnight rain to parts of E Britain and to SW parts of England and Ireland towards dawn. The rain on the E coast made further progress W in E Scotland and NE England during the day, while the rain in the SW spread into E Ireland and S Wales by the evening. It was a dull day in most places, but it turned sunny in SW Ireland after the rain passed. (Lee-on-Solent 14.0C, Aviemore 7.7C maximum, Drumnadrochit 0.1C minimum, Culdrose 8.8 mm, Shannon Airport and Cork Airport 6.0 h.)

A SE'ly flow dominated the weather on the 20th brining rather cloudy skies from that direction - while weak fronts crossing from the W also gave rather cloudy skies. Parts of W Ireland had an early air frost while areas in NE England and E Scotland (close to the coast), and places close to the Irish Sea, had some overnight rain which was heavy in places. The rain in E Scotland continued during the day and there was further heavy rain in N Ireland. Elsewhere it was generally dry but cloudy with mist for much of the day after any early fog had thinned; many places remained sunless. Some thick fog formed again in the evening in parts of England and Scotland. (Isles of Scilly 13.8C, Aviemore 6.5C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 0.0C minimum, Ballywatticock 28.6 mm, Stornoway 5.4 h.)

Mist and fog were again widespread by dawn on the 21st and there was some air frost in N Scotland. Rain moved into SW Ireland by dawn and this then spread to all areas (except Cent and N Scotland) by the evening - and then to most of Scotland by midnight. The rain brought warmer conditions behind it - particularly to SW parts of the British Isles - while there was very little sunshine during the day away from N and E Scotland. (Valentia 14.2C, Lake Vyrnwy 5.8C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -2.2C minimum, Killowen 27.0 mm, Lerwick 2.2 h.)

Overnight the rain area continued to move NE'wards giving most places a fall overnight into the 22nd - except in the extreme E of East Anglia and SE England. Rain reached these areas during the day ad was followed by brighter conditions from the W - although the Northern Isles remained wet for much of the day and the SE corner of England did not see the sun before the evening. Mist and fog patches formed in much of E Britain in the evening. (Hereford 16.1C, Dalwhinnie 8.6C maximum, Dalwhinnie 5.1C minimum, Harris Quidnish 21.2 mm, Cork Airport 5.3 h.)

Cold fronts dominated the weather in England overnight into the 23rd - and in E England for much of the day with some heavy falls in SE England. Elsewhere, apart from some rain across Scotland due to another front, it was a generally dry day as pressure rose from the SW reaching 1024 over SW Britain and S Ireland by 2400 GMT. Early in the day clearing skies led to a widespread ground frost in Ireland and parts of N Scotland - and both Ireland and much of Scotland away from the NW had a sunny day. (Manston 12.7C, Killylane 5.3C maximum, Katesbridge -3.4C minimum, Hampstead 37.4 mm, Cork Airport 7.8 h.)

Except in Scotland there was a widespread ground frost on the 24th with some mist and fog in S England by dawn and an air frost in a few places. There was some overnight rain in N and W Scotland overnight with further falls in W Scotland and W Ireland during the day. Mist and fog formed in the evening across much of England and Ireland after a sunny day in England and S Scotland. Ireland and N Scotland remained rather cloudy due to an E'ward moving front that brought the rain during the day. (Milford Haven 11.6C, Llysdinam 4.6C maximum, Benson -3.5C minimum, Kinlochewe 7.0 mm, Camborne 7.3 h.)

Away from S Ireland, the Northern Isles and SW Scotland there was a widespread ground frost on the 25th - with a widespread air frost in England and N Scotland. Many places had widespread mist or fog - the mist subsequently persisting all day in many areas. Rain fell in S Ireland and W Scotland overnight and then in SW and Cent S England and S Wales during the day with lighter falls elsewhere in England and Wales. By the evening rain had spread into N England and N Ireland - associated with a low centred to the S of England that led to an E'ly flow developing in many areas during the day. Many areas were sunless during the day - with parts of Wales and N Scotland seeing the best of the sun. Some snow fell over high ground in N Britain at times with temperatures quite low in places in Scotland. (Isles of Scilly 10.6C, Braemar 2.0C maximum, Sennybridge -4.2C minimum, Isle of Portland 17.8 mm, Lerwick, Kirkwall and Kinloss 4.6 h.)

Scotland, Ireland and N England had a widespread ground frost on the 26th with early mist and fog patches with an air frost in many parts of inland Scotland. Cloudier skies gave overnight rain to much of England and Wales and rain also fell in parts of W Scotland with a little snow over higher ground here. During the day Ireland and N Scotland had a sunny day while England and Wales remained mostly dull - with rain in many E parts of England and Scotland and generally misty conditions in other areas of England and Wales. The mist and fog thickened in the evening and became more widespread across the British Isles. (Jersey Airport 11.8C, Balmoral 3.0C maximum, Aviemore -3.1C minimum, Brooms Barn 14.2 mm, Shannon Airport 6.1 h.)

Mist and fog over the British Isles on the 27th was slow to clear and it remained misty with a few fog patches across England throughout the day. Parts of Ireland and N and cent Scotland had an early air frost - as did a few places in Wales and SW England. There was further rainfall overnight in the E half of England and in E Scotland - with some snow in the Highlands. Rainfall continued during the day close to the E coast due to a weak front and a flow from the SE. As a result the W half of the British Isles had the best of the sunshine with much of England (away from the SW) remaining rather dull. (Isles of Scilly 13.0C, Lake Vyrnwy 5.2C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch -3.5C minimum, Heathrow 8.0 mm, Valley 6.8 h.)

Misty conditions again affected much of England during the 28th. E and NE Scotland had some overnight rain - with further falls here during the day that also affected parts of NE and E England. England and E Scotland had a generally sunless day with the best of the sunshine to be found in Wales and W Scotland. It was a mild day in all areas, especially in the extreme SW of the British Isles and on the Channel Islands. Close to Penzance the E'ly wind topped force 7 on cliff tops, gusting to 48 kn at St Ives, and 34 kn at Penzance. Despite the strong E wind the temperature reached close to 15C - 14.8C in Penzance and 14.2C even in the near gale at St Ives. (Valentia 14.8C, Lentran 6.2C maximum, Derrylin Cornahoule -0.6C minimum, Lerwick 11.4 mm, Aberporth 5.9 h.)

The 29th was another day with widespread mist, fog, haze and cloud. Some outbreaks of rain moved N'wards across many areas overnight and during the morning - clearing to the E. Further rain and drizzle spread into W parts of Scotland and Ireland later in the day. Wales and S England had sunny periods after the early rain had cleared - further N and W it remained rather dull throughout the day. The temperature widely exceeded 15C in west Cornwall, with over 15C at Camborne, 15.3C at Land's End and 15.2C at Penzance; these temperatures were accompanied by virtually unbroken sunshine and light winds. (Jersey Airport 16.9C, Lerwick 8.0C maximum, Aviemore -1.4C minimum, South Uist 5.2 mm, Bude 7.0 h.)

Scotland had falls of rain overnight into the 30th, gradually spreading E'wards, with lesser falls across parts of Ireland. The rain had largely cleared by dawn at which time there was widespread mist or fog across S Ireland, Wales and England. This cleared only slowly during the morning - and persisted into the afternoon in S England. Further patchy mist and fog formed in places in Cent Ireland, N England and E Scotland in the evening. (Cardiff Bute Park 14.2C, Lentran 6.6C maximum, Tulloch Bridge 1.6C minimum, Lerwick 8.0 mm, Morecambe 7.1 h.)

British Isles weather, December 2014

A weakening occluded front moved W'wards over E Britain during the morning of the 1st but soon faded as a cold front pushed E'wards towards Wales from the W of Ireland during the day. The result was a rather cloudy day after an early ground frost in E Scotland, Wales and W Britain. Rainfall in he E was slight but there was widespread mist and fog across the British Isles by dawn. It then remained hazy in E and Cent parts of England until rain arrived from the W. Only parts of S Wales and SW England saw more than an hour of sunshine. (Bude 12.9C, Wych Cross 5.3C maximum, Balmoral -1.7C minimum, Achnagart 16.8 mm, Bude 4.7 h.)

The cold front did not quite clear SE England on the 2nd but behind it pressure rose from the W, reaching 1029 mb in SW Ireland by 2400 GMT. Overnight Britain was dull with some rain and mist; Lerwick reported an early morning snow shower. But skies cleared across Ireland by dawn with a ground frost being widespread here - and in parts of Cent Scotland. During the day rain was largely confined to east Anglia and SE England - although some W-facing coastal sites had a shower or two. Except for E and Cent districts of England it was quite a sunny day. (Guernsey Airport and Culdrose 10.0C, Tulloch Bridge 2.8C maximum, Tulloch Bridge -3.6C minimum, Whitechurch 10.2mm, Cork Airport 7.3 h.)

High pressure early on the 3rd gave way and a weak front moved NW'wards across S and Cent England and East Anglia during the day. There was only a little overnight rain in parts of SE England and East Anglia (although E Kent was quite wet in places) with clear skies elsewhere leading to an air frost from Devon through Wales to N England and E/Cent Scotland, along with E Ireland. Ground was widespread except in the cloudy SE corner of England. E Scotland and Cent and W England and Wales and N England had a sunny day but it was cloudy in W and N Scotland and in Ireland. After a cool start to the evening mist and fog returned to parts of this sunny area while a narrow line of rain spread NW'waards with the front. (Aultbea 10.7C, Eskdalemuir 1.2C maximum, Redesdale Camp -5.1C minimum, Manston 9.6 mm, Camborne 7.4 h.)

During the 4th patches of mist and fog, and spells of light rain and drizzle, were the main features of the weather across the British Isles. Parts of Wales, N England and E Scotland had a sharp air frost in places and during the day temperatures failed to reach 5C in many parts of England - away from the W - as skies remained cloudy. (Kinlochewe 10.4C, Wych Cross 1.3C maximum, Redesdale Camp -5.2C minimum, Logan Botanic Garden 11.4 mm, Cork Airport 6.0 h.)

Cloud and rain cleared SE'wards during the 5th as pressure from the W to 1032 mb in SW Ireland at 2400 GMT. Ireland, W Scotland and W Wales had rain overnight due to a cold front. Further E it was rather misty with a widespread air frost in Wales and some light rain and drizzle later in many areas. Rainfall amounts in E Scotland and E and Cent England were slight during the day, while a few showers affected coastal parts of Ireland and W and N Britain during the day; these showers included some snow and thunder in places. (Cardiff Bute Park 9.6C, Tulloch Bridge 1.3C maximum, Trawsgoed -2.8C minimum, Achnagart 13.8 mm, Leuchars 5.7 h.)

Clear skies under high pressure led to a widespread air frost on the 6th - except in Ireland where the cloudy end of a warm front led to an overnight minimum temperature of 7.9C at Valentia. Some hail was reported on the Channel islands around 0000 GMT. Much of Ireland and Scotland had a cloudy day under a warm sector with rain moving slowly E'wards here and into Wales and N England in the evening. It was a sunny day for much of England although daytime temperatures failed to reach 6 or 7C in many places. As pressure fell (998 mb over Shetland at 2400 GMT) it turned windy in the N and W. (Achnagart 11.7C, Marham 4.2C maximum, Benson -6.8C minimum, Achnagart 43.8 mm, Odiham 7.1 h.)

A cold front continued to sweep across the E half of the British Isles on the 7th introducing a brisk W'ly flow to all areas. Rainfall was widespread over Ireland , Scotland, Wales and W England overnight - when there was a slight air frost in parts of SE England. During the day rainfall amounts were much less in the E, while showery outbreaks, including some snow, hail and thunder in the N, affected the W half of the British Isles during the day. Over high ground the snow fell as far S as Cumbria and N Ireland. Emergency services dealt with a string of road accidents on the A9 as snow, ice and strong winds affect parts of Scotland. Police said there were "several" incidents on the Perth to Inverness road near the Drumochter Pass. Scotland's ski centres, including CairnGorm Mountain near Aviemore and Nevis Range near Fort William, had already seen some snow and were hoping for more to get the new season under way. (Swanage 12.4C, Aviemore 1.2C maximum, Frittenden -2.9C minimum, Cassley 33.4 mm, Dublin Airport 6.0 h.)

There was a widespread ground frost overnight into the 8th, which began with generally cool conditions and some overnight showery fall - especially in the W half of the British Isles. Daytime precipitation was mostly confined to the N half of the British Isles - much of England, S Scotland and E Ireland had a sunny day. Lerwick reported thunder during an early morning shower while there were reports of hail on Jersey during the day. Over Scotland and high ground in N England, the Pennines and N Ireland there were falls of sleet or snow, especially during the morning. It was a generally cold day. (Isles of Scilly 9.2C, Killylane 1.7C maximum, Shawbury -1.6C minimum, Logan Botanic Garden 18.6 mm, Yeovilton 6.2 h.)

A deep low close to Iceland swept a frontal system across the British Isles on the 9th, also bringing windy conditions to all areas. The UK had a widespread air frost but it was cloudy in the W and across Ireland by dawn with widespread rain across Scotland by dawn. The rain spread steadily E to affect all areas during the day as a warm sector moved quickly E'wards. Showers followed the main rain areas from the W, these being sometimes heavy with hail, snow and some thunder. Ice and snowy conditions caused problems for drivers in parts of north Wales. The Old Horseshoe Pass, Llangollen, Denbighshire, was closed because of ice. Snow and hail have been reported in some upland areas and council gritters took to the roads. (Hawarden 13.3C, Lerwick 7.4C maximum, Dalwhinnie -6.3C minimum, Cluanie Inn 49.2 mm, Manston 1.3 h.)

A brisk W'ly flow persisted during the 10th. Rain and showers were widespread overnight - with further falls during the day, especially over Ireland and W Scotland. Data from the Met Office indicated gusts of 81 mph at Tiree, 79 mph at South Uist Range and 77 mph at Port Ellen. At higher levels 109 mph was recorded on Cairngorm Summit and 105 mph at Bealach Na Ba. Snow, hail and thunder (the latter especially in N Scotland) accompanied many of the showers, and there were blizzards due to the strong winds in the Scottish mountains. The snow fell as far S as high ground in N England and N Ireland. Up to 100 vehicles were stranded when snow blocked a section of the A68 on the England-Scotland border. About 40 volunteers from three mountain rescue teams joined police in a three-hour operation to clear the road in the early hours of Thursday. No-one was reported hurt, but the road was blocked in both directions around Carter Bar until about 0200 GMT on Thursday. It was a rather cloudy day across Scotland but quite bright for much of the Midlands and S England. (Isles of Scilly 10.6C, Braemar 1.9C maximum, Braemar -0.6C minimum, Cluanie Inn 29.0 mm, Manston 6.3 h.)

The wind slowly eased a little during the 11th but by 2400 GMT a new low, centre 991 mb, was positioned over SE Ireland. Overnight rain and showers continued to affect all areas away from the SE corner of England and this pattern continued for much of the day. Later, spells of rain spread from the SW as the low centre approached from the SW. Across Scotland and high ground in N England and N Ireland the showers fell as snow, giving some heavy falls in places leading to further traffic disruption. The sunniest conditions were to be found in E England, although even here there were cloudy skies for much of the day. (Jersey Airport 11.6C, Carterhouse 0.6C maximum, Balmoral -0.7C minimum, Llysdinam 23.8 mm, Boulmer 4.8 h.)

An area of low pressure crossed from SE Ireland towards Denmark during the morning of the 12th, leading to widespread falls of rain across England, Wales and Ireland before dawn - while E Scotland had a sharp air frost in places and there was another area of frontal rain over N Scotland overnight. The rain fell as snow on some high ground in N England. It remained cloudy in S England with the rain being slow to clear the Channel Islands during the day. N Scotland also had a cloudy day as showery falls of rain and snow moved SE'wards over Scotland. The A9 reopened after being closed from Granish near Aviemore to Inverness to allow snowploughs to clear the road, Traffic Scotland said. Police Scotland said heavy snowfalls had made driving difficult on the stretch between Tomatin, near Inverness, and the city. (Guernsey Airport 11.5C, Carterhouse 1.3C maximum, Balmoral -4.6C minimum, Gogerddan 24.4 mm, Dublin Airport 6.5 h.)

There was a widespread air frost into the 13th with mist and fog forming in Cent England by dawn. There were a few hail showers in N Scotland overnight and snow showers over much of the high ground in Scotland. It was a cloudy day in Scotland and W Ireland as an advancing front brought cloud and then rain from the west by early evening. Elsewhere it was quite a sunny day but with some showers in W areas of England and Wales - the frontal rain reached Wales and N England later in the evening. (Jersey Airport 9.5C, Pateley Bridge Ravens Nest 1.8C maximum, Eskdalemuir -6.6C minimum, Achnagart 17.4 mm, Wellesbourne 6.8 h.)

The presence of several fronts and troughs made for a generally cloudy day on the 14th with overnight falls of rain in the W becoming more widespread during the day. During the afternoon and evening there were thundery showers over the Northern Isles accompanied by falls of hail. Showers also affected some S areas of the UK. Some snow fell over N hills and it turned stormy on the Northern Isles later as MSL pressure fell to 984 b on Shetland by 2400 GMT. (Bude 11.0C, Loch Glascarnoch 5.1C maximum, Frittenden -5.9C minimum, Loch Glascarnoch 36.8 mm, Manston 5.0 h.)

The 15th was a rather cloudy day. Frontal rain overnight in the SE largely cleared by dawn but low pressure close to the W end of the English Channel gave some spells of rain and drizzle in the SW later in the day. A general NW'ly flow led to further showers in many W areas with some hail and thunder in the Northern Isles. Snow fell in showers over N Scotland and the Northern Isles throughout the day. Some mist and fog patches formed in S areas of England in the evening. (St Catherines Point 10.6C, Aviemore 2.1C maximum, Aboyne -2.5C minimum, Kinlochewe 13.6 mm, Manston 4.7 h.)

Mist and fog patches were widespread across S England by dawn on the 16th. There was an air frost here and in parts of the S Midlands and N Scotland - with overnight rain affecting N Ireland and W and N Scotland. Some snow also fell in N Scotland over high ground for a time. Rain was widespread across Ireland and W areas of the UK during the day as a warm sector spread across from the W. Scotland had further showers during the day with turned to snow in places. Ahead of the frontal rain much of E England had a sunny day. (Isles of Scilly 11.7C, Braemar 1.9C maximum, Benson -3.2C minimum, Thomastown 16.2 mm, Charlwood 6.1 h.)

The 17th dawned after a widespread wet night - with some heavy falls of rain over high ground in Wales. In W Ireland overnight minimum temperatures were above 10C in places. Rainfall during the day was lighter in nature, and the trailing cold front edged slowly S'wards across Scotland during the day leading to showery falls here later. Mist, cloud and rain and drizzle affected other areas during the day and into the evening and in most places it was a generally sunless day. A few places in the E of the UK did manage an hour or so of sunshine and temperatures reached 13C in parts of East Anglia and SE England. (Hawarden 14.2C, Loch Glascarnoch 5.9C maximum, Aboyne -0.8C minimum, Capel Curig 26.4 mm, Wattisham 2.7 h.)

Frontal cloud and rain made for a mainly dull day on the 18th although these did migrate SE'wards as the day progressed. The cloud resulted in a mild night and day although it turned cooler in the N in the evening. Most places had spells of slight or moderate rain during the day - these were prolonged in places. (Hereford 15.3C, Loch Glascarnoch 4.8C maximum, Dyce 0.8C minimum, Lake Vyrnwy 36.2 mm, Leeming 2.4 h.)

Cold fronts cleared S England during the morning of the 19th, resulting in a largely dry and sunny day here after a wet night. Elsewhere a brisk W'ly flow produced frequent outbreaks of rain and showers, which were at times wintry over high ground. Some of the showers were blustery, with thunder reported over W and N areas of Scotland. IN SE England overnight minimum and daytime maximum temperatures were similar. Most places had spells of sunshine, except in N Scotland. (Guernsey Airport 12.3C, Braemar 2.1C maximum, Braemar 0.2C minimum, Kinlochewe 25.8 mm, Nottingham 6.1 h.)

Although pressure built from the SW for a while on the 20th (MSL pressure 1032 mb in SW Ireland at 1200 GMT), bands of cloud and rain affected N areas at times. Overnight there was rain across much of Scotland (with some heavy wintry showers in the N), N Ireland and in parts of N England although during the day precipitation amounts were generally less - until the evening when further fronts crossed NW Scotland. (Swanage 10.9C, Braemar 4.4C maximum, Shoreham 0.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 15.0 mm, Leconfield 4.7 h.)

A warm front spread across most areas from the W during the 21st, although the following cold front had edged S'wards across N and Cent Scotland by 2400 GMT. This led to a rather cloudy, frost-free night with rain in the W of Britain and Ireland overnight - and widespread cloud, rain and drizzle fell during the day. Across Scotland the rain was heavy during the day over high ground in NW and Cent areas with the rain slowly moving S'wards. Although dull, it was a mild day everywhere. (Hereford 14.0C maximum, Braemar 8.7C maximum, South Newington 0.3C minimum, Cluanie Inn 89.0 mm, Hawarden 1.9 h.)

The rain on the cold front made only slow progress S'wards on the 22nd into N England and N Ireland. This led to a wet period over S Scotland and N Ireland and later N England during the night and day. Overnight minimum temperatures were as high as 11C across many parts of Ireland, Wales and England. There was a brisk wind with showers, some of them falling as snow, to the N of the front during the day. To the S of the front there was light drizzle and some rain, but conditions here were quite mild in a brisk flow from the SW. (Nantwich 14.2C, Loch Glascarnoch 5.0C maximum, Loch Glascarnoch 3.1C minimum, Auchincruive 43.8 mm, Morpeth Cockle Park 2.4 h.)

The S half of the British Isles had a mild night and day on the 23rd and although the main area slowly moved S'wards during the day falls were slight and patchy over much of Cent, E and SE England. As the rain edged S'wards it turned drier from the N, although in the evening there were further outbreaks of rain in the extreme NW. Temperatures widely reached 12C in parts of S Ireland and in Cent and S parts of England and Wales. (Gravesend 13.7C, Lentran 4.0C maximum, Fyvie Castle -0.1C minimum, Shap 33.6 mm, Kinloss 4.7 h.)

Parts of E Scotland had an air frost into the 24th while minimum temperatures in S England remained above 10C in many places. Overnight there were spells of rain across Scotland with rain and drizzle, light but widespread, further S in Britain. This rain and drizzle largely cleared by midday, but across Scotland it remained showery with hail and thunder in places. Away from N and Cent Scotland there were sunny periods in most areas at times. (Shoreham 11.7C, Braemar 3.5C maximum, Aboyne -4.0C minimum, Cluanie Inn 30.6 mm, Hawarden 6.0 h.)

High pressure to the S meant a day on the 25th with sunny spells in most places, but weak fronts and troughs also gave some outbreaks of rain in some N and E parts of Scotland and England. Before dawn there was a widespread ground frost with an air frost in N Scotland. Both overnight and during the day precipitation was mainly confined to Scotland. (Jersey Airport 10.7C, Balmoral -2.1C maximum, Kinbrace -5.7C minimum, Keel 9.4 mm, Wellesbourne 6.6 h.)

Although the 26th began with a widespread air frost (except in Cent and S Ireland) and temperatures remained below freezing during the day in E Scotland, an area of low pressure moved E'wards across Cent parts of Ireland, Wales and England after 1200 GMT to give widespread falls of rain across S Scotland and places to the S. Ahead of the rain there were widespread mist and fog patches in E areas - while the rain was preceded by some falls of sleet and snow over higher ground and places in N and Cent England that led to travel disruption in places. In places depths on the ground amounted to a few centimetres. (Isles of Scilly 11.8C, Balmoral -3.3C maximum, Braemar -8.5C minimum, Gogerddan 28.8 mm, Dyce 1.0 h.)

Overnight rain, and some sleet and snow, into the 27th cleared away to the E in E England during the morning. There was a widespread air frost across Scotland and in parts of N England and N Ireland overnight. With a N'ly airflow during the day it was generally cold, with showers in many areas that were wintry in places over high ground and in N Britain. Many places again had a rather dull day. (Isles of Scilly 9.3C, Loch Glascarnoch 0.0C maximum, Braemar -8.3C minimum, Wainfleet 35.4 mm, Watnall 4.4 h.)

High pressure on the 28th (MSL pressure 1041 mb over N Devon at 2400 GMT) led to mainly settled weather throughout the day. There was a widespread early air frost with mist and fog patches forming before dawn in many parts if Cent and N England and Wales. Some showers affected E coastal areas of England and Scotland overnight. Away from the Northern Isles it was sunny day. In the evening mist and fog reformed in Cent England. (Port Ellen 9.3C, Tulloch Bridge -0.1C maximum, Katesbridge -6.8C minimum, Lake Vyrnwy 6.0 mm, Camborne 7.1 h.)

Pressure remained high on the 29th although a weak warm front gave some rain in W Scotland in the evening. There was a widespread moderate or severe air frost before dawn with mist and fog across England, Wales and N Ireland not clearing until late morning in places; it soon reformed later once the sun had set. Away from NW Scotland it was widely a sunny day. (Harris Quidnish 9.1C, Threave -0.7C maximum, Katesbridge -8.8C minimum, Emley Moor 5.4 mm, Camborne 7.1 h.)

MSL pressure remained high in the S on the 30th (1040 mb in coastal parts of Cent S England at 1200 GMT). Mist and fog was widespread across many parts of England before dawn and there was a widespread air frost in England, Wales and E Scotland. Some rain and drizzle fell overnight in parts of W and Cent Scotland and it was a rather cloudy day in N Scotland and in W Ireland. Elsewhere most places had a dry and sunny day. (Achnagart 10.6c, Cranwell 2.0C maximum, Benson -7.5C minimum, Lusa 5.0 mm, Bude 7.0 h.)

There was another widespread air frost in England on the 31st, away from extreme N and W areas, although in SW Ireland overnight minima were closer to 10C. Mist and fog in the frosty area cleared during the late morning in most places by when frontal rain had spread E into NW England and much of Ireland and W and Cent Scotland. The rain made further progress E in the afternoon and evening, although it remained dry in SE England and adjacent counties. (Kinlochewe 12.4C, Fylingdales 3.9C maximum, South Farnborough -6.7C minimum, Achnagart 29.2 mm, Wittering 5.8 h.)


Last updated 16 January 2015.